NC213: Marketing and Delivery of Quality Grains and BioProcess Coproducts

(Multistate Research Project)

Status: Active

NC213: Marketing and Delivery of Quality Grains and BioProcess Coproducts

Duration: 10/01/2018 to 09/30/2023

Administrative Advisor(s):


NIFA Reps:


Statement of Issues and Justification

The 5-year cycle for the multi-state research project NC-213, Marketing and Delivery of Quality Grains and BioProcess Coproducts ends on September 30, 2018. At the March 2017 Annual Meeting, the NC-213 Executive Committee and Membership created a committee to rewrite the project for the next 5-year cycle. 


NC-213 researchers address critical, continuing issues in post-harvest grain quality. A major strength of the committee is its multi-disciplinary approach to research, facilitated by the diverse disciplinary background of researchers, including the fields of engineering, economics, grain and food science, plant pathology, entomology, and others. Advances have been made in several areas: 



  • Reducing breakage of corn and oilseeds during handling and transport

  • Methodologies for instrumental and sensor measurement of grain quality attributes

  • Innovative and alternative technologies and practices to prevent insect, microbial, and fungal damage to grain and grain by-products in storage

  • Agronomic practices resulting in high biomass to fuel conversion during processing

  • Use of quality management practices and assurance systems for grain characterization, identity preservation, traceability, food safety, and regulatory compliance

  • Risk analysis modeling of toxins in grain and oilseeds

  • Prevention of post-harvest losses through enhanced handling and storage technologies

  • Optimizing processing systems to balance the needs of feed, food, and fuel outputs

  • Development of various processes for scalable and sustainable production of new food, energy, and bioproducts


Continuing research examines strategies in processing and handling to improve safety and quality of wheat flour. Projects have identified tempering practices and milling conditions as potential factors in lowering the microbial load of wheat flour and improving the quality of the final product, noting better dough handling and higher loaf volume in wheat flour bread. The feasibility of alternative screening and separation analytic methods were developed and tested for use in toxin screening in maize and sorghum and breeding sorghum for enhanced nutritional quality. Many measurement and testing options exist, but changes in instruments and mycotoxin test kits require both speed and accuracy. The quality of grain and the speed and accuracy of measurement and testing methods has critical implications for biotechnology concerns, food safety and usage of co-products from biofuel operations.


With increased production capacities and aging grain handling infrastructure, bulk markets are not adequately prepared to manage procedures intended to document and validate food safety activities in the grain and oilseed supply chain. The ability to implement, document, and verify activities such as clean out, segregation, traceback, recall, and isolation has never been more important. Providing guidance on the implementation of these procedures through ISO and other standards organization is expected to serve as the basis for a practical training program for food safety in the grain and oilseed handling and processing industries.


Post-harvest handling and storage practices remain a challenge to global food security.  As usage of biofuel co-products increase, handling practices must be developed for these products. Collaborative projects between several NC-213 institutions have examined characteristics of cooling and hopper flow characteristics of dried distiller’s grains (DDGS) – a major by-product of ethanol production. A second collaboration examined pack factors – a major factor in storage and inventory of grain. Bin and material properties were investigated and considered in the development and validation of the new packing model, using updated data. The former pack factor tables were based on data from the 1930s and 1940s. An updated procedure will be used by all U.S. farmers. The new model is expected to improve the management of over 9 billion bushels of grain with less than 1% error in inventory management, representing a savings of approximately $840 million dollars nationally. The multidisciplinary background of the research team was a primary factor in their ability to update a long-standing management tool to address 21st century grain and oilseed production and storage practices.


Improvement in storage practices has application in several areas. Post-harvest storage systems play a major role in grain quality. The quality of grain is increasingly important in both domestic and international markets. Understanding economically efficiencies to supply quality grain is an important concern for U.S. producers, handlers, and processes. Several projects have examined how these changes influence domestic supply and demand, product risk, and production choices.  Changing economic conditions, government policies, technical innovations, and biological barriers all provide opportunities for study and improvement of grain, oilseed, and by-product systems.  


Advances in grain quality have created new and larger challenges for NC-213 researchers. Variable market and weather conditions along with increasing production, aging infrastructure, and a shortage of laborers with appropriate skills add further challenges. Additionally, as resistance to phosphine increases, determining feasible alternatives for post-harvest storage is critical. These challenges require a collaborative and multi-disciplinary research and extension approach. To address these challenges, a systems approach to delivery of a low-cost, safety-focused, and high-quality grain and oilseeds value chain for food, feed, fuel, and other products is required. Continued emphasis on collaboration between disciplines, funding agencies, institutions, regional centers, and industry will be organizational priorities in the 2018 to 2023 cycle.


Two major factors that influence the success NC-213 has been noted in past cycles. The first of these is the annual technical meeting.  The NC-213 meeting provides an outstanding opportunity for academic and government researchers to interact with industry stakeholders through presentations, panel discussions, and networking during informal conversations.  Through these interactions, practical ideas for solutions, policy, practice, and research emerge to address specific engineering, scientific, and economic issues associated with the project objectives. This interaction enhances the quality of research experiences and provides for the development of innovative research, opportunities for extramural funding, and mentoring of young professionals.


A second factor influencing the past successes of the NC-213 group is the strong industry participation and influence. Industry representative from grain handling, marketing, storage and processing companies, service suppliers, and equipment manufacturing play a significant role in each meeting. An Industry Advisory Board with five elected representatives and a chair that serves on the NC-213 executive committee has been in place since 2000. An industry panel discussion on current U.S. and global trends in grain marketing has been a part of the annual meetings since 2012. These discussions identify emerging research needs that are a part of both the annual research plans and the 5-year project cycle. Blending these diverse perspectives shapes the independent NC-213 participants into a unified and market-centered research team.


NC-213 has enhanced the efficiency of the U.S. grain industry and preserved value in the grain, oilseed, and coproduct supply chain since 1977. As many of the original researchers retire, a strong foundation has been laid for incoming researchers and scientists to address new challenges in grain quality. Collaboration between stations and the resulting shared expertise across multiple disciplines was an important factor in NC-213’s first 40 years. These collaborations must continue to retain and develop current researchers to compete in the new, increasingly multi-disciplinary and diverse research environment. NC-213 facilitates these partnerships and will continue to guide emerging research ideas in marketing and delivery of quality grain products and bioprocess coproducts.

Related, Current and Previous Work

Related Work


NC-213 focuses on the supply chain for grains, oilseeds, and their processed co-products. With the global emphasis on food and feed safety, food security, environmental management, biosecurity, the importance of pre- and post-harvest quality concerns remain, increasing the need for the research generated by NC-213. No other multistate projects showed duplication in this area. A CRIS and NIFA search of other multistate projects that could potentially overlap with NC-213 objectives found no other similar projects.


Other multistate projects do not relate.


Current, Previous Work and Impacts


NC-213 scientists have developed and are continuing to refine non-invasive techniques using Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIR), X-ray, X-ray microtomography and other image analysis tools to determine the quality and processing characteristics of grain, oilseeds, and associated food products. A primary impact of these advancements is to create uniformity and reduce analytical support costs of measurement in the grain and oilseed industry while enhancing safety and quality.


NC-213 scientists lead research on automated detection of wheat kernels damaged by fusarium head blight (FHB), which results in yield reductions of up to 50% and over $1 billion in crop losses in the U.S. Another hazard of FHB is the toxins produced, which are subject to FDA guidelines. The new technology will be used to rapidly screen new wheat lines for FHB resistance and enhance the ability to detect FHB in wheat, improving the safety of the U.S. food supply and preserving key export markets.


NC-213 scientists created an innovative insect measurement system using electrical conductance. The system has low costs and is rapid, inspecting a 1kilogram sample of product in less than one minute. The system was created through a partnership with an industrial partner. Production and marketing is in progress and the commercial version of the technology is currently being adopted by a major food manufacturing company.


NC-213 scientists built and tested a low-cost wheat sorting device using a personal computer and a color camera. The accuracy of the device is 15 to 20 percent higher than existing sorting devices and programming techniques are used to increase a high throughput while keeping costs low.


NC-213 scientists have continued to test near infrared transmission analyzers to enhance the ability of the instruments to measure the composition of corn, wheat, soybean and barley samples. Additionally, soybean meal, distiller’s grains, and bakery meal have also been added to the database. Nine machines have been tested at least once, and several have been used for more than one crop. The more instruments are able to be used by the USDA Grain Inspection packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) without a loss in consistency, the lower testing costs for the grain and oilseed market chain will be.


NC-213 researchers created face-to-face training and distance education modules to train FDA Regulatory personnel on the grain and oilseed handling and processing system. As a result, 225 FDA inspectors have gained a practical knowledge of agricultural bulk commodity handling and processing facilities, to better meet the requirements of the Food Safety Modernization Act.


NC-213 scientists created a guidance document for the application of ISO 22000, Food Safety Management Systems in bulk processing and handling operations. The document was developed as part of the American Association of Cereal Chemistry’s Food Safety Task Force.  


NC-213 researchers have focused on the development of rapid, non-destructive technologies to reduce aflatoxin levels in maize samples, especially at elevators and other grain collection points. The aim is to identify and divert contaminated grain into alternative uses, protecting the food and feed supply and increasing producer profitability and consumer safety. Recent efforts have focused on the use of fluorescence multispectral imaging to detect fungal infection and aflatoxin contamination.


NC-213 scientists have examined pre-milling interventions to reduce the microbial load of wheat. Saline-organic acid solutions and organic acids with sodium chloride were tested as antimicrobial treatments. A reduction in microbial contamination in flour was validated in two market classes of wheat with known pathogens. These results represent an important step toward in providing a safe, ready-to-eat flour for products untreated with heat, and therefore, at risk for consumption by consumers.


NC-213 scientists have investigated pretreatment and extraction protocols for use of flaxseed and flaxseed extracts in fermented foods. The use of flaxseed has nutritional benefits, but little was known about the stability during food processing techniques. Findings indicate that flaxseed lignans and phenolics are stable to fermentation processes when used in a fermented juice process.


NC-213 scientists have also investigated the effect of a delayed harvest on the quality of durum wheat. Durum wheat is important commercially, as it is used in pasta production. Delayed harvest resulted in a decreased yield and lower quality of several attributes. The magnitude of the quality loss varied with cultivar, but the research illustrates the importance of timing for optimum yield at harvest.


NC-213 scientists have completed a risk assessment to determine the food safety risk of mycotoxins in the Pacific Northwest, given recent climate variability. The Pacific Northwest region provides a broad sample of different climates relatively close together, and therefore, was an ideal region to study how climate conditions influence crop toxin and disease development in the region.


NC-213 scientists have played a leading role in the development and delivery of the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance course on Preventive Controls for Animal Food. The course was offered four times to 60 participants each. Offerings were targeted at feed ingredient suppliers, regulatory personnel, and fuel ethanol producers.


NC-213 scientists have lead training sessions on the mitigation of grain dust explosions. Training has been conducted for over 400 workers in five states. The training emphasized engineering controls, properties of grain dust, and other mitigation strategies of use to grain handling workers. After completion of the training, workers had an increased awareness of preventive operations needed to mitigate grain dust explosions in the grain handling environment.


NC-213 scientists evaluated the efficacy of sealed storage structures to control insect pests in fumigated grain. Fumigant concentrations, insect bioassays, and pressure half-life decay times were measured. Findings revealed an adult mortality of higher than 99% in all insect bioassays, which included some resistant strains.


NC-213 scientists completed a revision of Grain Drying, Handling, and Storage Handbook, Third Edition. The book is distributed nationally and internationally by the Midwest Plan Services at Iowa State University, maximizing its influence and impact among extension engineers, grain storage practitioners, grain handling equipment manufacturers, farmers, and university and community college faculty and students.


NC-213 scientists estimated costs and risks associated with chemical-based and integrated pest management (IPM) pest-control strategies in stored grain facilities. Findings indicated that sampling-based IPM strategies can be economically effective under certain conditions by partially replacing fumigation in controlling insects within stored grain facilities.


NC-213 scientists have tested strategies to determine the rate of grain spoilage by measuring the effective diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide. The study measured corn at three temperature and three moisture content levels. The study increased knowledge on the movement of CO2 in corn – identified as an important component of further development on an effective and commercially feasible technique for using CO2 sensors to monitor grain quality in storage bins and silo bags.


NC-213 scientists used reflectance based sensors to measure the quality of canola seed. Specific traits tested included rancidity, free fatty acids, extraneous material, number of green seeds and erucic acid content. The scientists found that a flat-bed scanner can be used to detect foreign material in canola, near infrared techniques can be used to estimate rancidity in canola when free fatty acids and peroxide content were also measured, and that erucic acid content can be effectively estimated with near infrared techniques.


NC-213 scientists tested the effect of pre-cleaning shelled corn to reduce mycotoxin levels in corn processed into ethanol and distillers grains. They found that pre-cleaning strategies such as screen cleaning, density sorting, and color sorting were found to be effective at lowering mycotoxin levels, but researchers questioned whether the costs associated with these methods were too high as compared with reduction levels. Research has continued on other approaches to removing mycotoxins from dried distillers grains and DDGS co-products.

Objectives

  1. To measure, model, and assess factors which influence quality and safety attributes in the post-harvest usage, drying, handling, and distribution of cereal grains and oilseeds.
  2. To improve management and operational systems to increase efficiency, retain quality, enhance value, and preserve food safety in the farm-to-user supply chain.
  3. To work with multi-institutional colleagues to improve the cereal grain and oilseed supply chain by creating measurable impacts that preserve quality, increase value, and maintain food safety / food security.

Methods

The NC-213 project focuses on the farm-to-user supply chain for grains, oilseeds, and their co- and processed products. A global emphasis on food safety, biosecurity, environmental management and post-harvest quality management increases the need for systems-based approaches to handling and processing problems. Collaborations between institutional and industry participants has been a key driver of research outputs, competitive grant proposals, and large scale impacts, both in the U.S. and internationally.

The annual technical meeting, managed by NC-213 personnel at The Ohio State University, has had an important influence on establishing informal collaborations and partnerships. Research presentations have historically created opportunities for interactions and exchanges that are not always measured in formal ways, but have resulted in wide technology advancement dissemination and adaptation. The integration of the NC-213 group with industry groups such as the Grain Elevator and Processing Society (GEAPS) and the U.S. Wheat Council has broadened the perspective of both industry and academic professionals.

Each objective below emphasizes advancements falling under the three stated objectives. The following section will describe both existing projects and potential projects to be formalized in the next NC-213 cycle. The NC-213 administered Anderson Grant Research Program will target emphasis areas and continue to provide funding for preliminary and pilot research concepts.

Objective 1. To measure, model, and assess factors which influence quality and safety attributes in the post-harvest usage, drying, handling, and distribution of cereal grains, oilseeds, and their co-products.

1.1) Examine factors influencing wheat quality and baking properties of wheat flour (ND, NE)

1.2) Develop non-invasive imaging techniques (Near infrared, soft x-rays, X-ray microtomography) and various pre-treatment processes to characterize quality traits and measure resulting processing characteristics of grains, oilseeds, and co-products (AR/IA/IL/IN/KS/KY/MS/ND/NE/TX/USDA)

1.3) Develop in-line near infrared calibrations for measuring quality components of wheat corn, rice, and soybean products and co-products destined for industrial applications (IA/IN/ND/NE/USDA)

1.4) Assess and report economically viable attributes for corn, soybeans, and wheat for use in conducting cost/benefit analyses and market impacts resulting from the measurement of novel value-added attributes (IA/MT/ND/OK/USDA)

1.5) Develop a stored grain ecosystem model to evaluate the cause of deficient fumigations in storage bunkers (USDA/KS)

1.6) Evaluate the effect of preprocessing methods and dry grind processes on corn utilized in ethanol production (IL/IN/IA/ND)

1.7) Investigate physical and chemical methods of reducing fungal growth and mycotoxins in grain and oilseeds and their associated co-products (AK/IL/MS/ND/NE/TX/USDA)

1.8) Develop lower cost systems for inventory control of large grain storage structures and improve the post-storage quality of grains stored in these structures (IN/KY/USDA)

Objective 2. To improve management and operational systems to increase efficiency, retain quality, enhance value, and preserve food safety in the farm-to-user supply chain.

2.1) Utilize advanced experimental and mathematical simulations to validate and assess drying, storage, and chilling operations of grain, rice, and oilseeds (AR/ID/IN/MT/USDA)

2.2) Examination and evaluation of strategies for managing large-scale organic grains and oilseeds (IN/KY)

2.3) Determine the influence of grain packing on critical inventory metrics with conventional and specialty grain products (IN/KS/KY/OK/USDA)

2.4) Develop standards for food safety risk analysis and traceability in bulk grain and grain product supply chains (IA/TX)

2.5) Evaluate and model the feasibility of existing tolerance levels for non-genetically modified (GM) corn (IA/IN)

2.6) Develop and test novel methods for drying, handling, and storage of post-harvest corn, rice, soybeans, and wheat in the U.S. and in developing countries (AR/IA/IL/IN/KY/OK/USDA)

2.7) Investigate the operational and economic feasibility of conventional and non-conventional options for mitigation, prevention, and control of stored product insects and pests in grain and food processing facilities (AR/IA/IL/IN/ND/NE/KS/KY/MS/OK/USDA)

2.8) Assess the role of environmental, human, production, and machinery conditions on in-field drying, harvest losses, harvest logistics, and supply chain robustness and risk management. (IA/KY)

2.9) Reduce biohazard risk, quality and quantity losses, cost of distribution, and cost of regulatory compliance using information technologies that facilitate supply chain traceability and communication (IA/IN/OK/ND)

2.10) Identify and evaluate the influence of environmental and economic factors on sustainable grain handling practices (IA/ID/IN/OK/ND/USDA)

Objective 3. To work with multi-institutional colleagues to improve the cereal grain and oilseed supply chain by creating measurable impacts that preserve quality, increase value, and maintain food safety / food security.

3.1) Conduct outreach activities emphasizing research findings and educational trainings for students, extension professionals, industry professionals, academic researchers, and other stakeholders (All participating stations)

3.2) Increase the awareness of industry professionals on grain production and handling hazards through continuing education training programs, including grain dust explosion mitigation, grain engulfment, and chemical safety hazards (IA/IN/KY/OK/TX)

3.3) Develop spreadsheet tools to facilitate inventory management of stored grain in conventional and horizontal storage structures (KY)

3.4) Develop and adopt a common set of calibration update protocols, user practices and databases to be published as standard methods in one or more Methods Compendia (All participating stations). These will be available first to NC-213 members, then other public users, and then to private sector users

3.5) Expand current industry-funded organizations and programming to distribute grain operations training and enhance collaborations in applied problem solving on emerging grain quality related issues (IA/IN/KS)

3.6)  Assist regulatory personnel on cost effective regulatory compliance and extend Food Safety Modernization Act training to industry professionals in food and feed safety (IA/IN/KS)

3.7) Expand grain analysis services in grain composition, storage susceptibility, quality attributes, and toxin identification (IA/IN/TX/USDA)

3.8) Revise the Midwest Plan Service publication on managing dry grain in storage (AED-20) (IA/IN/KY/ND/OK)

 

Measurement of Progress and Results

Outputs

  • Objective 1 Comments: • Increased knowledge of efficient and effective processing and milling practices to optimize the baking properties of wheat flour • Indicators of post-harvest storage quality and processing properties will be identified and measured in a non-destruction way • Near infrared (NIR) calibrations will be validated through multi-institutional laboratories, potentially increasing the number of NIR instruments that can be used to measure quality attributes • Quality factors of grain, oilseeds, and co-products will be identified and measured in more efficient and effective ways, which in turn will facilitate greater economic value for grain and oilseed products and co-products • Determine post-harvest storage fumigation methods that are most effective, in terms of pest control, environmental impacts, and cost efficiency • Identify preprocessing and dry grind processes that increase the usable yield of corn and corn starch in ethanol production • Development and evaluation of effective physical and chemical methods of reducing growth of fungus and toxins in grains, oilseeds, and coproducts • Create lower costs methods of storing large amounts of grain and enhance the ability to preserve the quality of grains stored in large structure
  • Objective 2 Comments: • Develop and validate new methods to enhance scientific knowledge of the quality and safety of grain and oilseeds in drying, storage, and chilling operations • Identification, measurement, and validation of methods for managing commodity-scale organic grain and oilseeds • Development and validation of parameters relating to grain pack factors with commodity and specialty grain products • Creation of a standards-based system for traceability in bulk grain and grain product supply chains • Development of a feasible tolerance level for non-GM corn in the bulk corn supply chain • Creation and adoption of low cost and low energy methods for post-harvest drying, handling, and storage of corn, rice, soybeans, and wheat • Development of effective and low cost ways of controlling stored product pests and insects post-harvest • Quantification of the role played by environmental, human, production, and machinery conditions on in-field drying, post-harvest loss, harvest logistics and supply chain risk management
  • Objective 3 Comments: • University students, extension and industry professionals, academic researchers, and other stakeholders will update their knowledge and skills in post-harvest grain handling, storage, and processing through a variety of mediums, including the annual meeting, web-based, online training, and hands-on workshops • Industry professionals will have an increased safety orientation as a result of face-to-face training programs focused on grain engulfment, mitigation of grain dust, and other physical and chemical safety hazards • Industry professionals will learn advanced inventory management through new, relevant spreadsheet tools • Updated and common calibration update protocols will be published for use by one or more Methods Compendia • Existing programming will be expanded to include industry-funded training and short course programming to address practical problems faced by the grain industry • Preventative Controls Qualified Individual training for animal feeds and human foods will be delivered to relevant industry and regulatory personnel • Grain analysis services will validate new instrumentation, pre-processing methods, and toxin identification for use in industrial and regulatory settings To accomplish the outputs identified above, at least four research proposals per year that involve two or more NC-213 participating entities will be submitted to national or other peer-reviewed sources other than those managed by NC-213. Other funding sources include state and national commodity groups, foundational and industry groups, state and national extension programs, and other government agencies at national and international levels.

Outcomes or Projected Impacts

  • Objective 1 Outcome / Impact 1: Grains with specialized traits well suited for baking, ethanol production, and other specialized end uses will be easier and less expensive to identify and measure. In addition to adding value to low-value commodity crops, a more efficient and effective identification of specialized traits means that higher quality grain can be delivered in a cost effective way to consumers and end users. Outcome / Impact 2: Near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) calibrations are an important component of non-destructive evaluation of quality attributes in grain and oilseeds. As the process of NIR calibration increases its accuracy, these advanced analytical techniques will become a more routine way to evaluate the quality and food safety aspects of grains and oilseeds. Trade will become more efficient because low quality grain, oilseed and co-products with food safety concerns can be removed from the supply chain. Outcome / Impact 3: More effective fumigation methods will reduce the need for chemical intervention and reduce costs for grain and food processors. Improved chemical and physical methods for detecting the growth of fungi and toxins reduces the food safety hazard in grains and co-products and allows regulatory agencies to prioritize their interventions toward products processed of higher value.
  • Objective 2 Outcome / Impact 1: Updated parameters related to the grain packing factors will be used for specialty grains and other factors influencing inventory management (loading/unloading cycles and aeration). Existing assumptions of the grain packing model will be validated and a new spreadsheet tool will be tested. These findings are expected to lead to a more effective method of tracking handling losses of vertical and horizontal structures on large farms and at commercial grain handling facilities. Outcome / Impact 2: Improved methods for handling, drying, and storing grain, rice, and oilseeds will facilitate improved quality and safety of processed grain, rice, and oilseed products. Understanding the role of environmental, human, production and machinery conditions is expected to improve the quality of grain and oilseed products and co-products, potentially increasing the trade value of products in the domestic and international market. Outcome / Impact 3: Development of a standards-based system to guide traceability and food safety practices within the bulk grain, oilseed, and co-product supply chain. Grain handling operations will be able to optimize food safety management and compliance with FSMA and other regulatory requirements. A critical examination of the feasibility of tolerance levels, which play a critical role in traceability and segregation of identity preserved products, will be completed. Findings could potentially implicate the ease by which non-GM corn can be handled and stored in commercial grain facilities and in the non-GM supply chain.
  • Objective 3 Outcome / Impact 1: Educational programming will be expanded in areas of compliance (FSMA, food safety regulatory requirements), worker safety related to grain quality (grain dust, chemical safety, grain engulfment), and grain storage and handling (drying, aeration, post-harvest handling). Several hundred workers and supervisors in grain handling and processing facilities will have updated information on food safety compliance, grain dust hazards, grain engulfment, chemical safety, and grain handling and storage practices. Outcome / Impact 2: Grain quality analysis services will provide new information to grain handlers and processors on NIR instrument calibration models and best practices in post-harvest handling, storage, and processing through collaboration and interaction with industry and non-industry professionals. Facilities for teaching and education purposes will be completed and used for continuing education. Standards and methods will be updated for use by industry, research, and regulatory professionals.

Milestones

(2018):Expansion of distance education and face-to-face programming will begin with courses to be offered at Iowa State University in January 2018; NC-213 Annual Meeting held in February 2018 with U.S. Wheat Council

(2019):Standards for traceability of bulk grain and oilseed products created; NC-213 Annual Meeting hosted by Iowa State University in February 2019

(2020):: Improvements in fumigation methods and inventory management updates published; NC-213 Annual Meeting held with Grain Elevator and Processing Society (GEAPS) in Minneapolis, Minnesota (projected)

(2021):Risk analysis tools implemented for the bulk grain supply chain; Updated NIR calibrations released for public use; NC-213 Annual Meeting held in February 2021, location to be determined

(2022):Improvements in grain trait identification published and adopted for use in grain breeding; NC-213 Annual Meeting to be held in February 2022, location to be determined

Projected Participation

View Appendix E: Participation

Outreach Plan

NC-213 has successfully engaged academic personnel from multiple disciplines and perspectives to disseminate and translate research findings into improved practices within the grain industry. NC-213 participants generally have split academic appointments in research, teaching, and/or extension. The Industrial Advisory Panel will continue to be involved in NC-213, playing a significant role in the annual meeting. Expansion of distance education opportunities will focus on grain industry professionals.  The practical approach to research is also highlighted in the Andersons Research Grant Program. Two industry representatives evaluate research proposals to insure relevance.


Annual meetings will continue to be held, where investigators share research results from each of the NC-213 Objectives and discuss opportunities for potential collaboration during networking sessions. Some meetings will partner with industry groups such as the Grain Elevator and Processing Society (GEAPS) and the U.S. Wheat Council in alternating years. Distance education will play an increasing role in the extension and outreach of NC-213 research findings. Industry-foundation supporting centers at several of the NC-213 institutions will provide marketing and execution of training and outreach programs resulting from NC-213 research. The goal of resolving practical problems faced by the grain industry also addresses current and projected needs of the U.S. agricultural work force.


Traditional outlets for research and extension professionals will continue to be utilized. These include: journal publications, conference proceedings, extension fact sheets, webinars, and academic, industry and public meetings and trade shows. Annual reports from the 2013-2018 cycle indicate a large number of presentations and publications per year from NC-213 related projects, with 39 peer-reviewed papers published and 29 scientific and Extension presentations shared in 2016.

Organization/Governance

The organization and operation of NC-213 will be similar to that used in the last five year cycle. A detailed description of roles and responsibilities is available at (http://www.nc213.org).


The NC-213 Administrative Advisor serves as the Project Coordinator. This position will remain based at The Ohio State University’s Agricultural Research and Development Center (OSU-OARDC). The quarterly newsletter and the NC-213 website will continue to be managed out of the office of the NC-213 Coordinator.  There will be five officers (chair, vice-chair, past chair, secretary, and the Industry Advisory Committee Chair), and six co-chairpersons, two for each of the objective groups. Officers and objective co-chairs are elected from the membership of the NC-213 Technical Committee.


The Executive Committee is made up of the coordinator, chair, vice-chair, past chair, secretary and objective chairs, the Industry Advisory Chair, and the USDA Representative. The Executive Committee sets the agenda for the annual business meeting, plans special meetings and conferences, overseas production of the annual report and oversees development and revisions of the 5-year work plan.


The NC-213 Technical Committee is made up of one designated representative from each of the participating organizations. It holds an annual business meeting, typically in conjunction with the annual NC-213 technical conference, to set future directions for the project.


The annual technical conference (typically held in February) will continue, with previously agreed upon improved requirements for presentations and publicity. The Annual Progress Reports from Participating Stations will be formatted to match the revised project outline. It will primarily be posted on the NC-213 website, and only a small number of hard copies will be printed and distributed.


Solicitation for Participation. 


Currently, there are three agricultural economists on the NC-213 project, including the 2018-2019 Vice Chair, Anton Bekkerman. Our active Industry Advisory Committee provide valuable insights on marketing and economic considerations of the grain and bioproducts market. We will utilize the Industry Advisory Committee to identify marketing and economic experts to the project. Many of the projects completed and proposals written by participating researchers involve economists who are not included in the NC-213 project. However, the need for marketing and economic analysis in the marketing and delivery of quality grains and bioprocess products is recognized by the group and we will continue to work with economists and to collaborate with economists but those individuals may not chose to be NC-213 members.


In addition, NC-213 Administrative Advisor/Coordinator along with the NC-213 Executive Committee will reach out to the NC-213 Community and encourage all researchers and partner U.S.D.A. Agencies and ask that they get in touch with economists/marketing experts in their field and share information about NC-213 and ask that they consider becoming a member via an Appendix E. 


 

Literature Cited

Licht, M., C.R. Hurburgh, M. Kots, P. Blake, and M. Hanna. 2017. Is there loss of corn dry matter in the field after maturity? 2017 Integrated Crop Management Conference Proceedings, 35-39. 


Bhadra, R., K.A. Rosentrater, and K. Muthukumarappan. 2017. Modeling distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) mass flow rate as affected by drying and storage conditions. Cereal Chemistry, (4(2), 298-309.


Xing, F., Yao, H., Liu, Y., Dai, X., Brown, R. L., Bhatnagar, D. (2017). Recent Developments and Applications of Hyperspectral Imaging for Rapid Detection of Mycotoxins and Mycotoxigenic Fungi in Food Products. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2017.1363709


Hruska, Z., Yao, H., Kincaid, R., Brown, R. L., Bhatnagar, D., Cleveland, T. E. (2017). Temporal effects on internal fluorescence emissions associated with aflatoxin contamination from corn kernel cross-sections inoculated with toxigenic and atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus. Frontiers in Microbiology. V8, 1718. DOI:10.3389/fmicb.2017.01718. 


Xing, F., Yao, H., Hruska, Z., Zhu, F., Kincaid, R., Brown, R., Bhatnagar, D., & Liu, Y. 2017. Detecting peanuts inoculated with toxigenic and atoxienic Aspergillus flavus strains with fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Proceedings of SPIE, “Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety IX”, 1021701. 


Yao, H., Zhu, F., Xing, F., Hruska, Z., Liu, Y., Brown, R., Bhatnagar, D. 2017. NIR Spectroscopy Analysis of Aspergillus flavus-Inoculated Peanut Kernels. 18th International Conference on Near Infrared Spectroscopy. ICNIRS-1233. Copenhagen, Denmark. June 11 -15. 


Sabillón L, Bianchini A, Stratton J, Rose DJ. 2017. Effect of saline organic acid solutions applied during wheat tempering on flour functionality. Cereal Chemistry 94:502-507. 


Poudel R, Bhatta M, Regassa T, Rose DJ. 2017. Influence of foliar fungicide treatment on lipolytic enzyme activity of whole wheat. Cereal Chemistry 94:633-639 


Navrotskyi S, Baenziger PS, Regassa T, Guttieri MJ, Rose DJ. Variation in asparagine concentration in Nebraska wheat. Cereal Chem. https://doi.org/10.1002/cche.10023 


Deng, L., Elias, E.M., and Manthey, F.A. 2017. Relationship between grain, semolina, and whole wheat flour properties and the physical and cooking qualities of whole wheat spaghetti. Cereal Chem. 94:801-804. 


Deng, L., Elias, E.M., and Manthey, F.A. 2017. Influence of durum genotype on whole wheat and traditional spaghetti qualities. Cereal Chem. 94:857-865. 


Baasandorj, T. (2016). Hard red spring wheat quality evaluation with various roller mill types and breadmaking methods. PhD Dissertaion. North Dakota State University. Retrieved from https://ezproxy.lib.ndsu.nodak.edu/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1858816358?accountid=6766


Tim Herrman and Harinder Makkar. 2016. Aflatoxin proficiency testing in labs. Feedipedia, Broadening Horizons. December #36 


Quantification of betaglucans, lipid and protein contents in whole oat groats (A.sativa. L) using Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy 2017. Gracia Montilla-Bascon, Paul R Armstrong, Rongkui Han and Mark Sorrells. J. of Near Infrared Spectroscopy.  25(3) 172–179 


Atungulu G. G. & Olatunde G. A., Sammy Sadaka. 2017.  Impact of Rewetting and Drying of Rough Rice on Prediction of Moisture Content Profiles during On-Farm In-Bin Drying and Storage. Drying Technology. Published online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07373937.2017.1345933.


Olatunde G. A & Atungulu G. G. 2017. Potential of Turbulence Interference in Rough Rice bin Drying and Storage System Fitted with Cabling Technology. Biosystems Engineering 163(2017), 1-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2017.08.010. 


Atungulu, G. G., and G. A. Olatunde. 2017. Assessment of New In-Bin Drying and Storage Technology for Soybean Seed. Drying Technology. Published online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07373937.2017.1335751. 


Deandrae L. Smith, Griffiths G. Atungulu. 2017. Impact of drying deep beds of rice with microwave set at 915 MHz frequency on the rice milling yields. Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies, 45 (2018) 220–227. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ifset.2017.10.009


Olatunde G., Atungulu G., Deandrae Smith. (2017). One-pass drying of rough rice with an industrial 915 MHz microwave dryer: Quality and energy use consideration. Biosystems Engineering, 155, 33-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2016.12.001. 


Atungulu G., Thote S., and Wilson S. 2017. Dry Matter Loss for Hybrid Rough Rice Stored under Reduced Oxygen Conditions. Cereal Chemistry. 94 (3): 497-501. 


Okeyo A., Olatunde G., Atungulu G., Sadaka S., McKay T. 2017. Infrared Drying Characteristics of Long-grain Hybrid, Long-grain Pureline, and Medium-grain Rice Cultivars. Cereal Chemistry. 94(3):251-261. 


Shantae A. Wilson, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Gbenga Olatunde. 2017. Quality, Decontamination, and Energy Use Considerations during Radiant-Heat and Tempering Treatments of Shelled Corn. Cereal Chemistry. 94 (4): 705-711.


Wilson S.A, Okeyo A.A, Olatunde G.A, and Atungulu G.G. 2017. Radiant heat treatments for corn drying and decontamination. Journal of Food Processing and Preservation.  41(1), 2017; 00e13193. doi:10.1111/jfpp.13193. 


Steve C. Ricke, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Chase E. Rainwater, Si Hong Park. 2017. Food and Feed Safety Systems and Analysis. Academic Press, Elsevier, London Wall, London EC2Y 5AS, United Kingdom. 


G.G. Atungulu, Z. Mohammadi-Shad and S. Wilson. 2017. Mycotoxin Issues in Pet Food. In: Food and Feed Safety Systems and Analysis. Steve C. Ricke, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Chase E. Rainwater, Si Hong Park (eds). Academic Press, Elsevier, London Wall, London EC2Y 5AS, United Kingdom. Pg. 25-39. 


Gbenga A. Olatunde and Griffiths G. Atungulu. Emerging Pet Food Drying and Storage Strategies to Maintain Safety.  In: Food and Feed Safety Systems and Analysis. Steve C. Ricke, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Chase E. Rainwater, Si Hong Park (eds). Academic Press, Elsevier, London Wall, London EC2Y 5AS, United Kingdom. Pg. 45-58. 


Anne Huss, Roger Cochrane, Cassie Jones and Griffiths G. Atungulu. Physical and Chemical Methods for the Reduction of Biological Hazards in Animal Feeds In: Food and Feed Safety Systems and Analysis. Steve C. Ricke, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Chase E. Rainwater, Si Hong Park (eds). Academic Press, Elsevier, London Wall, London EC2Y 5AS, United Kingdom. Pg. 83-92. 


Xuhui Zhuang, Chen Zhao, Keshun Liu, Peter M. Rubinelli, Steven C. Ricke and Griffiths G. Atungulu. Cereal Grain Fractions as Potential Sources of Prebiotics: Current Status, Opportunities, and Potential Applications In: Food and Feed Safety Systems and Analysis. Steve C. Ricke, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Chase E. Rainwater, Si Hong Park (eds). Academic Press, Elsevier, London Wall, London EC2Y 5AS, United Kingdom. Pg. 173-187. 


Xiaotuo Wang, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Ragab Gebreil, Zhengjiang Gao, Zhongli Pan, Shantae A. Wilson, Gbenga Olatunde, David Slaughter. Sorting in-shell walnuts using near infrared spectroscopy for improved drying efficiency and product quality. International Agricultural and Biological Engineering Journal. 26(1), 165-172. 


Ragab Khir, Griffiths Atungulu, Ding Chao, Zhongli Pan. Influences of harvester and weather conditions on field loss and milling quality of rough rice. International Journal of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. 10(4), 216-223. DOI: 10.25165/j.ijabe.20171004.2993. 


Ramaswamy, S.K. and G.A. Mosher. 2017. Using workers’ compensation claims data to characterize occupational injuries in the commercial grain elevator industry. Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health, 23(3), 203-217. 


Sharma, R. and C.R. Hurburgh. 2017. Bulk product traceability – challenges and opportunities. Book chapter. 


Bekkerman, A. “Data-Driven Innovation: An Integrated Public-Private R&D Framework for the 21st Century.” In proceedings, Grain Elevators and Processors Society Exchange, March 2017.


Bekkerman, A., and M. Taylor. “Influence of Shuttle Loaders on Grain Markets in Kansas and Montana.” Arthur Capper Cooperative Center Fact Sheet Series, Paper #10, August 2017. 


Fulbright, J., K. Wanner, A. Bekkerman, D. Weaver. Wheat Stem Sawfly Biology. Montana State University Extension, MontGuide (MT201107AG), March 2017.


John, A. A., Jones, C. A., Ewing, S. A., Sigler, W. A., Bekkerman, A., & Miller, P. R. (2017). Fallow replacement and alternative nitrogen management for reducing nitrate leaching in a semiarid region. Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, 108(3), 279-296. 


Maxwell, B., B. Weed, L. Ippolito, A. Bekkerman, M. Boone, M. Mills-Novoa, D.Weaver, M. Burrows, and L. Burkle. “Agricultural and Climate Change in Montana.” Chapter in 2017 Montana Climate Assessment, Whitlock C., Cross W., Maxwell B., Silverman N., and Wade AA, eds. Bozeman and Missoula MT: Montana State University and University of Montana, Montana Institute on Ecosystems. September 2017. 


Bhadra, R., M.E. Casada, S.A. Thompson, J.M. Boac, R.G. Maghirang, M.D. Montross, , A.P. Turner, and S.G. McNeill. 2017. Technical note: Field-observed angles of repose for stored grain in the U.S. Applied Engineering in Agriculture 33(1): 131-137. 


Turner, A.P., M.D. Montross, J.J. Jackson, N.K. Koeninger, S.G. McNeill, M.E Casada, J.M. Boac, R. Bhadra, R.G. Maghirang, and S.A. Thompson 2017. Technical Note: Stored grain volume measurement using a low-density point cloud. Applied Engineering in Agriculture 33(1): 105-112. 


Maier, D., S. McNeill, and K. Hellevang. Grain Drying, Handling, and Storage Handbook. MWPS-13, Third Edition. Midwest Plan Service, Ames, IA. 


Xiao, J. C. Hart, and S.H. Lence. 2017. USDA forecasts of crop ending stocks: How well have they performed? Applied Economics Perspectives and Policy, 39, 220-241. 


Hurburgh, C.R. 2016. Quality in the 2016 crop. Proceedings of the 28th Integrated Crop Management Conference, ISU Extension and Outreach, Ames, IA. November 30, 2016. 


McGinnis, S. & C. R. Hurburgh.  2015.  Equivalence of Near Infrared Transmission Instruments for Grain Analyzers.  Poster presented at the 2015 AACCI Annual Meeting, Minneapolis MN, October 2015. 


Nelson, C.K. & C. R. Hurburgh.  2015.  Mass Balance Evaluation of Dry Grind Ethanol Plant Options.  Poster presented at the 2015 AACCI Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN, October, 2015. 


Yao H., Z. Hruska, R. L. Brown, D. Bhatnagar, T. E. Cleveland, Hyperspectral Imaging Technology for Inspection of Plant Products Ch 9 in “Hyperspectral Imaging Technology in Food and Agriculture” edited by Dr. Park and Dr. Lu., published by Springer, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-4939-2835-4. 


Yao, H., Hruska, Z., & DiMavungu, J. D. 2015. Developments in Detection and Determination of Aflatoxins. World Mycotoxin Journal. 8(2), 181-191.


Zhu, F., Yao H., Z. Hruska, R. Kincaid, R. L. Brown, D. Bhatnagar, T. E. Cleveland. 2016. Integration of Fluorescence and Reflectance Visible Near-Infrared (VNIR) Hyperspectral Images for Detection of Aflatoxins in Corn Kernels. Transactions of the ASABE. 59(3): 785-794. 


Sabillón, L, Stratton J, Rose DJ, Regassa TH, Bianchini A. 2016. Microbial load of hard red winter wheat produced at three growing environments across Nebraska, USA. Journal of Food Protection 79:646-654. 


Sabillón, L, Stratton J, Rose DJ, Flores RA, Bianchini A. Reduction in microbial load of wheat by tempering with organic acid and saline solutions. Cereal Chemistry 93:638-646.


Hall III, C. and Gebreselassie, E. 2016. Understanding Lignan (SDG) stability in Fermented Beverages. Proceedings of the 66th Flax Institute of the United States. Edited by H. Kandel and C. Hall. Published by North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND. pp 31-38. 


Rajala, F., Syverson, D., Niehaus, M. and Hall, C. 2016. Assessing Peroxide Value in Flaxseed – an oxidation indicator. Proceedings of the 66th Flax Institute of the United States. Edited by H. Kandel and C. Hall. Published by North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND. pp 86-90. 


Hall III, C. and Gebreselassie, E. 2016. Understanding Lignan (SDG) stability in Fermented Beverages. The 66th Flax Institute of the United States Meeting, Fargo, ND March. 31-April 1, 2016. 


Rajala, F., Syverson, D., Niehaus, M. and Hall, C. 2016. Assessing Peroxide Value in Flaxseed – an oxidation indicator. The 66th Flax Institute of the United States Meeting, Fargo, ND. March 31-April 1, 2016.


Simsek, T. Baasandorj, J. Ohm. 2016. Does mill type affect ranking of hard red spring wheat cultivars based on end-use quality? Abstract. AACC International. http://www.aaccnet.org/meetings/Documents/2016Abstracts/aacc2016abs65.htm 


Lee, K. M., Herrman, T. J., and Post, L. 2016. Evaluation of selected nutrients and contaminants in distillers grains from ethanol production in Texas. Journal of Food Protection. 79, 1562-1571. 


Armstrong, P.R., Dell’Endice, F., Maghirang, E. B., and Rupenyan, A. 2016. Discriminating oat and groat kernels from other grains using near-infrared spectroscopy.  Cereal Chem


Armstrong, P.R., Maghirang,  E.B., Yaptenco, K.F. and Pearson, T.C. 2016.  Visible and near-infrared instruments for detection and quantification of individual sprouted wheat kernels. Trans. of ASABE.


Girad, A.L., Perez-Castell, M.E., Bean, S.R., Adrianos, S. L., Awika, J. M. (2016). Effect of condensed tannin profile on wheat flour dough rheology. J. Agric. Food Chem. 64: 7348-7356.


Cobb, A., Wilson, G.W., Goad, C.L. Bean, S.R., Kaufman, R.C., Herald, T.J., and Wilson, J.D. 2016. The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in grain production and nutrition of sorghum genotypes: Enhancing sustainability through plant-microbial partnership. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment. 233: 432-440.


G. Atungulu, H. Zhong, G. S. Osborn, A. Mauromoustakos, C. B. Singh. 2016. Simulation and Validation of On-Farm In-Bin Drying and Storage of Rough Rice. American Society of Biological and agricultural Engineers, Applied Engineering Journal, Vol. 32(6), 881-897. 


Atungulu G., and Hou Min Zhong. 2016. Assessment of strategies for natural air in-bin drying of rough rice in Arkansas locations. American Society of Biological and agricultural Engineers, Applied Engineering Journal, Vol. 32(4): 469-481.  DOI 10.13031/aea.32.11361. 


Olatunde G., Atungulu G., Sadaka S. 2016. CFD modeling of air flow distribution in rice bin storage system with different grain mass configurations. Biosystems Engineering 151(2016), 286-297.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2016.09.007


Atungulu G., Thote S., Wilson S. 2016. Storage of Hybrid Rough Rice – Consideration of Microbial Growth Kinetics and Prediction Models. Journal of Stored Product Research, 69(2016), 235-244. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jspr.2016.09.003


Atungulu G.G., Smith D., Wilson S., Sadaka S., Rogers S. (2016). Assessment of one-pass drying of rough rice with an industrial microwave system on milling quality. American Society of Biological and agricultural Engineers, Applied Engineering Journal, Vol. 32(3): 417-429.  DOI 10.13031/aea.32.11484. 


Olatunde G., Atungulu G., Deandrae Smith.  2016. One-pass drying of rough rice with an industrial 915 MHz microwave dryer: Quality and energy use consideration. Biosystems Engineering 155(2017), 33-43.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2016.09.007


Sammy Sadaka, Gagandeep S. Ubhi, Griffiths Atungulu. 2016. Effects of initial moisture content and heating rate on wheat (OAKES) drying kinetic parameters.  International Journal of Engineering Sciences & Research Technology. 5(9), 42-54. DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.61449.


Pan, H. M. El Mashad, X. Li, R. Khir, G. Atungulu, L. Zhao, P. Kuson, T. McHugh, R. Zhang. 2016. Demonstration tests of infrared peeling system with electrical emitters for tomatoes. Transactions of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), Vol. 59(4): 985-994, DOI 10.13031/trans.59.11728.


G.G. Atungulu, Z.R. Young, S. Thote, H.M. Zhong, and S. Sadaka. 2016. Improving Germination Rate of Soybean Seed Dried Using Recently Introduced In-Bin Drying Systems. Arkansas Soybean Research Studies 2014. Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station May 2016 Research Series 631, Page 184-188. 


Wilson S.A, Okeyo A.A, Olatunde G.A, and Atungulu G.G. 2016. Radiant heat treatments for corn drying and decontamination. Journal of Food Processing and Preservation. 2016; e13193. doi:10.1111/jfpp.13193. 


Okeyo A., Olatunde G., Atungulu G., Sadaka S., McKay T. 2016. Infrared Drying Characteristics of Long-grain Hybrid, Long-grain Pureline, and Medium-grain Rice Cultivars. Cereal Chemistry. Posted online on 17 Aug 2016, First Look. http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/CCHEM-07-16-0181-R


C.J. Bern, D. Bbosa, T.J. Brumm, K.A. Rosentrater, R.A. Suleiman. 2015. Blending maize and amaranth to control maize weevil during storage on smallholder farms. Presented and published in the proceedings of the First International Congress on Postharvest Loss Prevention, Rome, Italy, October 2015. 


A.M. Shaw. 2015. Food Safety Modernization Act Mini Conference (with FDA and Iowa Department of Inspection and Appeals). Workshop given in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 


C.E. Hart. 2016. Crop market outlook. Presented at the Iowa Farm Business Association in Altoona, Iowa; Farm Progress Show, Boone, Iowa; and the Northeast Iowa Research and Demonstration Farm Fall Field Day, Nashua, Iowa. 


Grover, A.K., S. Chopra, and G.A. Mosher. Food Safety Modernization Act: A quality management approach to identify and prioritize factors affecting adoption of preventative controls among small food facilities. Food Control, 66, July 2016, 241-249. 


Ramaswamy, S.K., Rosentrater, K.A., and G.A. Mosher. 2016. Does a NIR system provide low-cost alternative to on-farm feed and forage testing? A techno-economic analysis. ASABE Meeting paper #2460922. Orlando, FL: American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ASABE).


Turner, A.P., M.D. Montross, J.J. Jackson, S.G. McNeill, M.E. Casada, J.M. Boac, R. Bhadra, R.G. Maghirang, S.A. Thompson. 2016. Error analysis of stored grain inventory determination. Trans. ASABE. 59(3): 1061-1072.


Turner, A.P., M.D. Montross, J.J. Jackson, S.G. McNeill, M.E. Casada, J.M. Boac, R. Bhadra, R.G. Maghirang, S.A. Thompson. 2016. Modeling the Compressibility Behavior of Hard Red Wheat Varieties. Trans. ASABE. 59(3) 1029-1038.


Sekhon, J., N. Maness, and C. Jones. 2016. Effect of compressed propane extraction on storage stability of dried cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.). Journal of Food Engineering Jan16. 


Sekhon, J., N. Maness, and C. Jones. 2015. Effect of preprocessing and compressed propane extraction on quality of cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.). Food Chemistry 175: 322-328.


Ismayilzade, N, V. Samedov, B. Kard, and C. Jones. 2015. Sunflower seed damage and economic injury level of the European Sunflower Moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in the Republic of Azerbaijan. Journal of Entomological Science 50(2): 138-146.


Moore, K and C. Jones. Grain Entrapment Pressure on the Torso - Can You Breathe While Buried in Grain? Journal of Ag Safety and Health, ASABE. JASH-11648-2015.(Awaiting second round of reviewer comments)


Jones, C.L., 2016.  Grain Bin Entrapment: Don’t Let It Happen To You! BAE-1113. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 


Jones, C.L., 2016.  Grain handling automation and controls. BAE-1290. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 


Jones, C.L., 2016.  Grain bin entrapment: a case study from an Oklahoma country elevator. CR-1726. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 


Jones, C.L., C. Reed, and S. George. 2015. Grain Bin Safety Training, Instructors Manual and Student Manual. Oklahoma State University Fire Services Training Publishing, Stillwater, Oklahoma.


Jones, C.L., C. Reed, and S. George. 2015. Grain Bin Safety Training, Teaching Slides with video on external drive. Oklahoma State University Fire Services Training Publishing, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 


Grain Bin Safety. 2015. Video delivered on thumb drive. Oklahoma State Fire Services Training, Stillwater, Oklahoma.


Jones, C.L. and E. Bonjour. Preparing grain bins and flat storages prior to harvest or incoming product storage. Oklahoma State University Extension Service, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 


Grain Bin Safety Awareness. 2015. Curriculum for training ag workers.  Oklahoma State University Fire Services Training Publishing, Stillwater, OK. 


Bonjour, E., C. Jones and R. Beeby. 2015. A closed loop system improves phosphine fumigation in stored grain facilities.  Entomological Society of America.  Entomology 2015 Conference, November 15-18, 2015. Minneapolis, MN. 


Moore, K and C. Jones. 2015. Impact of a polyethylene liner on the storage of canola in unaerated steel bins – Year 1 results.  ASABE Annual International Meeting Paper No. 152189116, New Orleans, LA. July 29, 2015.


Jones, C. and G. Brown. 2015. Adapting a culture mapping technique to the needs of engineering students and researchers. ASABE Annual International Meeting Paper No. 152189818, New Orleans, LA. July 29, 2015.


Bonjour, E. and C. Jones. 2016. Minimizing insect infestations in grain storage facilities prior to harvest. XXV International Congress of Entomology. Orlando, FL. September 25-30, 2016. 


Turner, A.P., M.D. Montross, S.G. McNeill, M.P. Sama, M.E. Casada, J.M. Boac, R. Bhadra, R.G. Maghirang, S.A. Thompson. 2015. Modeling the compressibility behavior of hard red wheat varieties. Transactions of the ASABE 59(3): 1029‐1038. 


Turner, A.P., M.D. Montross, J.J. Jackson, N.K. Koeninger, S.G. McNeill, M.E Casada, R. Bhadra, J.M. Boac, R.G. Maghirang, and S.A. Thompson. 2015. Error analysis in the measurement of stored grain volume. Transactions of the ASABE 59(3): 1061‐1072.


Bhadra, R., M.E. Casada, J.M. Boac, A.P. Turner, S.A. Thompson, M.D. Montross, R.G. Maghirang, and S.G. McNeill. 2016. Correlating bulk density (with dockage) and test weight (without dockage) for wheat samples. Applied Engineering in Agriculture 32(6): 925-930.


Hurburgh, C. R. and E. Bowers.   2015.  Crop Quality and the Role of Agronomists in FSMA.  Proc 27th Integrated Crop Management Conference, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.  December 2, 2015. 


Hurburgh, C.R.  2015.  Pay Attention to Condition of Stored Corn. Integrated Crop Management Newsletter, ANR Extension and Outreach, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.  August 13, 2015. http://crops.extension.iastate.edu/cropnews


Hurburgh, C.R.  2015.  Challenges to Watch in 2015 Harvest.  Integrated Crop Management Newsletter, ANR Extension and Outreach, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.  September 20, 2015.  http://crops.extension.iastate.edu/cropnews


Hurburgh, C.R.  2015.  What a Difference the Weather Makes.     Integrated Crop Management Newsletter, ANR Extension and Outreach, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.  October 15, 2015.  http://crops.extension.iastate.edu/cropnews 


Hurburgh, C. R.  2015.  Crop Quality, Storage and FSMA.  Grower Seminar, D and B Agrosystems, Hubbard, IA.  December 8, 2015. (25).


Adam, Brian D., Rodney Holcomb, Michael D. Buser, Blayne Mayfield, Johnson Thomas, Philip Crandall, Corliss A. O’Bryan, Steven C. Ricke, Dar Knipe, and Richard Knipe. 2016. “Enhancing Food Safety, Product Quality, and Value-Added in Food Supply Chains Using Whole-Chain Traceability.” International Food and Agribusiness Management Review. Special Issue - Volume 19 Issue A:191-214.


Adam, B. D., C. C. Craige, and M. D. Buser. 2016. “Risk Reallocation in a Whole Chain Traceability System.” Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Fact Sheet NWCTI-17, June.


Buser, M. D, C. C. Craige, and B. D. Adam. 2016. “What Access will Government Agencies Have?” Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Fact Sheet NWCTI-16, June.


Thomas, J.P., C. C. Craige, M. D. Buser, and B. D. Adam. 2016. How Secure Is Your Data in the National Whole Chain Traceability System?.” Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Fact Sheet NWCTI-15, June.


C. Craige, T. K. Kumar, M. D. Buser, and B. D. Adam. 2016. “How to Use the NWCTI System.” Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Fact Sheet NWCTI-10, June.


C. Craige, M. D. Buser, and B. D. Adam. 2016. “How Consumers Would Use the National Whole Chain Traceability System.” Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Fact Sheet NWCTI-09, June. 


Stehle, A.M., C. C. Craige, M. D. Buser, and B. D. Adam. 2016. “Using RFID and Traceability Systems in Stocker Operations.” Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Fact Sheet NWCTI-05, June. 


Adam, B.D., C.C. Craige, and M.D. Buser. 2016. “What makes the National Whole Chain Traceability System Different? Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Fact Sheet NWCTI-02, June 2016.


Ge, Candi, and Brian D. Adam. 2016. “Value of Information in a Whole-Chain Traceability System for Beef Cattle: Application to Meat Tenderness.” Selected Poster presented at the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association annual meetings, Boston, MA, July 31-August 2.


Ge, Candi, and Brian D. Adam. 2016. Value of Information in a Whole-Chain Traceability System for Beef Cattle: Application to Meat Tenderness.” Selected Paper presented at the Western Agricultural Economics Association annual meetings, Victoria, BC, Canada, June 21-23.


Hurburgh, C.R., Alison Robertson and Erin Bowers.  2014.  Update on 2014 Crop Quality. Integrated Crop Management Newsletter.  Iowa State Extension and Outreach.  October 15, 2014.  http://www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/2014/1015Hurburgh.htm


Biller, Clemence, Charles Hurburgh, Nanning Cao, and Glen Rippke. 2014. Calibration of the JDSU MicroNir 1700 for agricultural product analysis. NIR News, 25: 16-29.


Medic, J, Dennis Lock, Charles R. Hurburgh, Jr. and Christine Atkinson.  2014. Uncertainty of methods for measuring soybean composition – an interlaboratory study.  Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society, 91: 363-384.


Joseph Kallenbach*, Bonnie Cobb, Scott Pryor, and Clifford Hall. Antioxidant Activity of Corn and Dry Distiller’s Grain Extracts in Chips. Presented at the American Oil Chemists Society Annual Meeting, May 3-6, 2015. Orlando, Fl.


Joseph Kallenbach*, Bonnie Cobb, Scott Pryor, and Clifford Hall. Antioxidant Activity of Corn and Dry Distiller’s Grain in Chips. Presented at the Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting.  July 11-14, 2015. Chicago, IL.


H. Khalid, L. Deng, F. Manthey, S. Simsek. 2015. Does bran particle size affect whole-wheat bread quality? Abstract. AACC International. http://www.aaccnet.org/meetings/Documents/2015Abstracts/aacci2015abs57.htm


Perumal, R., Tesfaye, T., Kofoid, K., Prasad, V.P., Aiken, R., Bean, S.R., Wilson, J., Herald, T., and Little, C. 2015. Registration of nine grain sorghum seed parent (A/B) lines. J. Plant Registrations 9:244-248.


Dunn, K.L., Yang, L., Girard, A., Bean, S., and Awika, J. M. 2015. Sorghum tannins in a wheat flour dough matrix: Interactions and effects on starch and protein digestibility in flour tortillas. J. Agric. Food Chem. 63:1234-1241.


Griffiths G. Atungulu, HouMin Zhong, Anne Okeyo, Supriya Thote. 2015. Prevalence of Molds on Freshly-harvested Long-grain Pureline, Hybrid and Medium-grain Rice Cultivars. American Society of Biological and agricultural Engineers, Applied Engineering Journal, 31(6), DOI 10.13031/aea.31.11216.


Lawrence, J., Atungulu, G.G., Siebenmorgen, T.J. 2015. Modeling In-Bin Rice Drying using Natural-Air and Controlled-Air Drying Strategies. Transaction of American Society of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, 58(4), 1103-1111. DOI 10.13031/trans.58.10911.


Wilson S. A., Atungulu, G.G., Couch, A., Sadaka, S.  Radiant heating and tempering treatments for improving rate of moisture removal during drying of shelled corn.  American Society of Biological and agricultural Engineers, Applied Engineering Journal, 31(5), 799-808. DOI 10.13031/aea.31.11243. 


Sammy Sadaka, Scott Osborn, Griffiths Atungulu and Gagandeep Ubhi. 2015. On-farm Grain Sorghum Drying and Storage.  Arkansas Grain Sorghum Production Handbook, Chapter 10, pg1-12.


G.G. Atungulu, H. Zhong, S. Thote, A. Okeyo, A. Couch, S. Sadaka, T. Siebenmorgen. 2015. Microbial Prevalence on Freshly Harvested Long-Grain Hybrid, Long-Grain Pure-Line, and Medium-Grain Rice. Rice Quality and Processing. B.R. Wells- Arkansas Rice Research Studies 2014, Research Series 626, 306-313.


Zhongli Pan, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Xuan Li. 2014. Infrared Heating. In: Emerging Technologies for Food Processing. 2nd Edition. Da-Wen Sun (ed.). Academic Press-an Imprint of Elsevier, San Diego CA. Pg. 461-474. 


Griffiths G. Atungulu and Zhongli Pan. 2014. Rice industrial processing worldwide and impact on macro- and micronutrient content, stability, and retention. ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, 1324 (2014) 15–28, doi:10.1111/nyas.12492.


Siebenmorgen, G. Atungulu, R. Norman, T. Roberts, P. Counce. Impacts of Nitrogen-Fertilizer Management and On Farm Drying Practices on Milling Yield and Quality of Rice. Ecosystems Interim report 01-2014 for BR Wells


Lee, H.J. and D. Ryu. 2015. Advances in mycotoxin research: Public health perspectives. J. Food Sci. doi: 10.1111/1750-3841.13156.


Kuruc, J.A., J. Hegstad, H.J. Lee, K. Simons, D. Ryu, and C. Wolf-Hall. 2015. Infestation and quantification of ochratoxigenic fungi in barley and wheat naturally contaminated with ochratoxin A. J. Food Prot. 78(7):1350-1356.


Bianchini, A., R. Horsley, M.M. Jack, B. Kobielush, D. Ryu, S. Tittlemier, W.W. Wilson, H.K. Abbas, S. Abel, G. Harrison, J.D. Miller, W.T. Shier, and G. Weaver. 2015. DON Occurrence in Grains: A North American Perspective. Cereal Foods World 60(1):32-56.


Paulsen, M.R., P.K. Kalita, and K.D. Rausch. 2015. Postharvest losses due to harvesting operations in developing countries: a review. ASABE Paper No. 152176663, presented at 2015 ASABE Annual International Meeting, New Orleans, LA, Jul 26-29, 2015. 


Paulsen, M.R. 2015. Harvesting: effects of crop maturity and moisture on losses. Abstract presented at First International Congress on Postharvest Loss Prevention, Rome Italy, Oct 4-7, 2015. 


Medic, J., C. Atkinson, and C. R. Hurburgh.  2014.  Current Knowledge in Soybean Composition.  J Am Oil Chem Soc (2014) 91:363–384


Laux, C, G. A. Mosher and C.R. Hurburgh.  2015.  Application of quality management systems to grain: an inventory management case study.  Applied Engineering in Agriculture, 31(2), 313-321.


Siliveru, K., R. Bhadra, R. P. K. Ambrose, and M. E. Casada. 2015. Hopper flow characteristics of modified distillers dried grains with solubles. ASABE Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana (Paper No. # 152189631).


Boac, J., R. Bhadra, M. E. Casada, S. A. Thompson, A.P. Turner, M. D. Montross, S. G. McNeill, R. G. Maghirang. Stored grain pack factors for wheat: comparison of three methods to field measurements. Trans ASABE 58(4): 1089-1101. 


Bhadra, R., A. P. Turner, M. E. Casada, M. D. Montross, S. A. Thompson, J. M. Boac, S. G. McNeill, R. G. Maghirang. Pack factor measurements for corn in grain storage bins. Trans ASABE. 58(3): 879-890.


A.P. Turner, M.D. Montross, S.G. McNeill, M.P. Sama, M.E. Casada, J.M. Boac, R. Bhadra, R.G. Maghirang, S.A. Thompson. Modeling the compressibility behavior of hard red winter wheat varieties. Submitted to Trans ASABE


A.P. Turner, M.D. Montross, J.J. Jackson, S.G. McNeill, M.E. Casada, J.M. Boac, R. Bhadra, R.G. Maghirang, S.A. Thompson. Error analysis of stored grain inventory determination. Submitted to Trans ASABE


A.P. Turner, M.D. Montross, J.J. Jackson, N.K. Koeninger, S.G. McNeill, M.E. Casada, J.M. Boac, R. Bhadra, R.G. Maghirang, S.A. Thompson. Stored grain surface estimation using a low density point cloud. Submitted to Appl. Eng. Agric.


Jefferson-Moore, K., A. Bekkerman, N. Piggott, B. Goodwin, S. Palat, and C. Turner. 2015. “Potential check-off benefits to farmers in the presence of wind-borne diseases.” Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development. 7(5):176-177. 


Bekkerman, A., E. Belasco, and A.Watson. “Decoupling Direct Payments: Potential Impacts of the 2014 Farm Bill on Farm Debt.” Agricultural Finance Review. 75(4):434-449. 


Chen, C., A. Bekkerman, R. Afshar, K. Neill. 2015. “Intensification of Dryland Cropping System for Bio-feedstock Production: Evaluation of Agronomic and Economic Benefits of Camelina sativa.” Industrial Crops and Products. 71(September):114–121. 


Miller, P., A. Bekkerman, C. Jones, M. Burgess, J. Holmes, and R. Engel. 2015. “Pea in Rotation with Wheat Reduced Uncertainty of Economic Returns in Southwest Montana.” Agronomy Journal. 107(2):541–550. 


Miller, P., C. Jones, A. Bekkerman, J. Holmes. Short-term (2-yr) Effects of Crop Rotations and Nitrogen Rates on Winter Wheat Yield, Protein and Economics in North Central Montana. Montana State University Extension, Fertilizer Facts (No. 68), January 2015.


Buteler, S.W. Sofie, D.K. Weaver, D. Driscoll, J. Muretta and T. Stadler. 2015. Development of nanoalumina dust as insecticide against Sitophilus oryzae and Rhyzopertha dominica. International Journal of Pest Management 61: 80-89. DOI: 10.1080/09670874.2014.1001008. 


Hurburgh, C. R.  2014.  Quality and Handling of the 2014 Iowa Crop.  Integrated Crop Management Newsletter.  Iowa State Extension and Outreach.  October 2, 2014.  http://www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/2014/1002Hurburgh.htm


Hurburgh, C.R., Alison Robertson and Erin Bowers.  2014.  Update on 2014 Crop Quality. Integrated Crop Management Newsletter.  Iowa State Extension and Outreach.  October 15, 2014.  http://www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/2014/1015Hurburgh.htm


Hurburgh, C. R.  2014.  Pay Attention to Stewardship Requirements for Biotech Grains.  Integrated Crop Management Newsletter.  Iowa State Extension and Outreach.  October 28, 2014.  http://www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/2014/1028Hurburgh.htm


Hurburgh, C. R.  2014.  Harvest 2014:  What We Know Now.  Proceedings of the 26th Annual Integrated Crop Management Conference.  Ames, IA.  December 3, 2014.  http://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/Proceedings-of-the-26th-Annual-Integrated-Crop-Management-Conference


Hart, C.E. 2015. Grain Market Trends and Outlook. Presented at the Northeast Iowa Research and Demonstration Farm Fall Field Day, Nashua, Iowa, August 2015.


Hart, C.E. 2015. Corn and Soybean Outlook. Presented at the Central Iowa Farm Business Association Annual Meeting, Paton, Iowa, August 2015.


Grover, A.K., S. Chopra, and G.A. Mosher. 2015. Adoption of Food Safety Modernization Act: A Six Sigma Approach to Risk Based Preventative Controls for Small Food Facilities. Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE), 2015 Conference Proceedings Papers, November 2015, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.


Ryan, S.J., C.V. Schwab, and G.A. Mosher. 2015. Agricultural risk: Development of a probabilistic risk assessment model for measurement of the difference in risk of corn and biofuel switchgrass farming systems. International Society of Agricultural Safety and Health paper #15-01. Bloomington-Normal, Illinois, June 2015.


Ramaswamy, S.K. and G.A. Mosher. 2015. Analysis of predictive factors for agricultural student perceptions of quality management mitigating safety. International Society of Agricultural Safety and Health paper #15-03. Bloomington-Normal, Illinois, June 2015.


Lidia Esteve Agelet and Charles R. Hurburgh. 2013. Limitations and Current Applications of Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Single Seed Analysis.  Talanta. (12): 288-299.


Medic, J, Dennis Lock, Charles R. Hurburgh, Jr. and Christine Atkinson.  2014. Uncertainty of methods for measuring soybean composition – an interlaboratory study.  JAOCS (submitted)


Baasandorj, T., Ohm, J., Simsek, S. 2014. Dark, Hard and Vitreous Kernel Content Effect on Flour and Baking Quality of Hard Red Spring Wheat. Abstract. AACC International. http://www.aaccnet.org/meetings/Documents/2014Abstracts/2014P79.html


MWPS-13 Grain Drying, Handling and Storage Handbook, Safety and Automation (2 chapters), Kansas State University Publishing. 2014.


Kamath, M., R. Ingalls, C. Jones, G. Shen, and P. Pulat. “A Decision Support System for Transportation Infrastructure and Supply Chain System Planning”. Oklahoma Transportation Center. OTCREOS7.1-25-F. 2014. 


Bajracharya, N., G. Opit, C. Jones, and J. Talley. 2014. Efficacies of spinosad and a combination of chlorpyrifos-methyl and deltamethrin against phosphine-resistant Rhysopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrianidae) on wheat. Journal of Economic Entomology 106(5):2208-15.


Sekhon, J., C. Jones and N. Maness. 2014. Effect of preprocessing and solvent extraction with compressed propane on quality of cilantro (Coriandrum Sativum L.). Food Chemistry 175: 322-328.


K.M. Lee, T.J. Herrman, Y. Bisrat, and S.C. Murray. 2014. Feasibility of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for raid detection of aflatoxins in maize. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 62:4466–4474.


K.M. Lee, J. Davis, T.J. Herrman, S.C. Murray, and Y. Deng. 2015. An empirical evaluation of three vibrational spectroscopic methods for detection of aflatoxins in maize. Food Chemistry. 173, 629-639.


Paul R. Armstrong, Elizabeth B. Maghirang and Tom C. Pearson.  2014. Detecting Black Tip-Damaged Wheat Kernels Using Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy.  Accepted to Cereal Chem. 


Herald, T., Gadgil, P., Perumal, R., Bean, S., and Wilson, J. 2014. High-throughput micro-plate HCl-vanillin assay for screening tannin content in sorghum grain. J. Sci. Food Agric. 94:2133-2136.


Cremer, J. E., Liu, L., Bean, S. R., Ohm, J. B., Tilley, M., Wilson, J. D., Kaufman, R. C., Vu, T. H., Gilding, E. K., Godwin, I. D., and Wang, D. 2014.Impacts of kafirin allelic diversity, starch content and protein digestibility on ethanol conversion efficiency in grain sorghum. Cereal Chem. 91:218-227.


Cremer, J.E., Bean, S.R., Tilley, M., Ioerger, B.P., Ohm, J.-B., Kaufmann, R.C., Wilson, J.D., Innes, D.D., Gilding, E.K., and Godwin, I.D. 2014. Grain Sorghum Proteomics: An integrated approach towards characterization of seed storage proteins in kafirin allelic variants. J. Agric. Food Chem. 62:9819-9831.


Kaufman, R.C., Wilson, J., Bean, S.R., Herald, T.J. and Shi, Y.C. 2014. Development of a 96-well plate iodine binding assay for amylose content determination. Carbohydrate Polymer 115:444-447.


Pontieri, P., Di Fiore, R., Troisi, J., Di Maro, A., Bean, S., Tuinstra, M., Roemer, E., Boffa, A., Del Giudice, A., Pizzolante, G., Alifano, P., and Del Giudice, L. 2014. Mineral content in grains of seven food-grade sorghum hybrids grown in a Mediterranean environment. Australian J. Crop Sci. 8:1550-1559.


Bean, S. R., and Ioerger, B. P. 2014. Sorghum and Millet Proteins. In: Applied Food Protein Chemistry. Ustunol, Z. Eds. Oxford Press.


Zhongli Pan, Griffiths G. Atungulu, Xuan Li. 2014. Infrared Heating. In: Emerging Technologies for Food Processing. 2nd Edition. Da-Wen Sun (ed.). Academic Press-an Imprint of Elsevier, San Diego CA. Pg. 461-474


Griffiths G. Atungulu, Hou Min Zhong, Koide Shoji. Simulation of Fixed-Bed Batch Drying of Rice Using the Sphere Drying Model. 2014 ASABE and CSBE | SCGAB Annual International Meeting, July 13 – 16, 2014, Montreal, Quebec Canada


Griffiths G. Atungulu, Hou Min Zhong, Terry Siebenmorgen. Survey of factors affecting Microorganisms on Freshly harvested Rice. 2014 ASABE and CSBE | SCGAB Annual International Meeting, July 13 – 16, 2014, Montreal, Quebec Canada


Griffiths G. Atungulu and Zhongli Pan. 2014. Rice industrial processing worldwide and impact on macro- and micronutrient content, stability, and retention. ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, 1324 (2014) 15–28, doi:10.1111/nyas.12492.


Siebenmorgen, G. Atungulu, R. Norman, T. Roberts, P. Counce. Impacts of Nitrogen-Fertilizer Management and On Farm Drying Practices on Milling Yield and Quality of Rice. Ecosystems Interim report 01-2014 for BR Wells


Nguyen, K.T.N. and D. Ryu. 2014. Ultrasonic extraction with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of ochratoxin A in processed cereal products. J. AOAC Int. 97(5):1384-1386.


Lee, H.J., A.D. Meldrum, N. Rivera, and D. Ryu. 2014. Cross-reactivity of antibodies with phenolic compounds in pistachios during quantification of ochratoxin A by commercial ELISA kits. J. Food Prot. 77(10):1754-1759. 


Nguyen, K.T.N. and D. Ryu. 2014. Development of a stir bar sorptive extraction method for analysis of ochratoxin A in beer. J. AOAC Int. 97(4):1092-1096.


Jelena Medic, Christine Atkinson, and Charles R. Hurburgh, Jr.  2014. Current knowledge in soybean composition.  JAOCS, 91: 363-384.


Ramaswamy, S.K. and G.A. Mosher. Perceptions of agricultural college students on the relationship between quality and safety in agricultural work environments. Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health, Accepted 11/2014.


Laux, C.M., G.A.Mosher, and C.R. Hurburgh. Application of quality management systems to grain: An inventory management case study. Applied Engineering in Agriculture.           Accepted 12/2014.


Ramaswamy, S.K. and G.A. Mosher. 2014. An investigation of quality climate and its association with implementation of quality management systems. Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE) 2014 Conference Proceedings Paper, November 2014, St. Louis, MO. 


Ryan, S.J. and G.A. Mosher. 2014. Use of risk mapping tools to identify hazards in bulk materials handling. Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE) 2014 Conference Proceedings Paper, November 2014, St. Louis, MO.


Ramaswamy, S.K. and G.A. Mosher. Pre-professional perceptions of safety and quality concerns in agricultural work environments. Presentation given at the International Society of Agricultural Safety and Health, Omaha, NB, June 2014.


Ryan, S.J. and G.A. Mosher. Conceptual risk mapping in the grain and oil seed chain. Presentation given at the North Central (NC) 213 Quality Grains Research Consortium, Omaha, Nebraska, February 2014.


Bhadra, R., Ambrose, K. Casada, M. and Siliveru, K. 2014. Comparison of flow and physical properties of modified DDGS with regular DDGS under varying storage conditions. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ASABE) Annual International Meeting Paper No. 141899398. St. Joseph, MI: ASABE.


Ambrose, K., Casada, M., Simsek, S., Bhadra, R. and Siliveru, K. 2014. Intrinsic characteristics of modified DDGS. NC-213 Annual Meeting, Omaha, Neb.


Boac, J. M., M. E. Casada, J. Lawrence, B. Plumier, D. E. Maier, and R. P. K. Ambrose. 2014. Modeling phosphine distribution in grain storage bunkers: Extended Abstract. In: Proceedings of the 11th International Working Conference on Stored Product Protection, 24-28 Nov. 2014, Chiang Mai, Thailand.


Hruska, Zuzana, Kanniah Rajasekaran, Haibo Yao, Russell Kincaid, Dawn Darlington, Robert L. Brown, Deepak Bhatnagar, Thomas E. Cleveland. 2014. Co-inoculation of atoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic strain of Aspergillus flavus to study fungal invasion, colonization, and competition in maize kernels. Frontiers in Microbiology. 5:122.


Hruska, Z., Yao, H., Kincaid, R., Brown, R., Cleveland, T., & Bhatnagar, D. 2014. Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Features of Aflatoxin and Related Secondary Metabolites and Their Application for Rapid Detection of Mycotoxins. Food Bioprocess Technol. 7(4), 1195-1201. DOI:10.1007/s11947-014-1265-2.


Adam, Brian D., Michael D. Buser, Blayne Mayfield, Johnson Thomas, Ashwin Kumar, Krishna Palepu, Phil Crandall, and Steve Ricke. 2014. “Whole-Chain Traceability in Beef Production – Information Sharing from Farm to Fork and Back Again.” Invited Presentation at the Southern Animal Health Association/National Association of State Meat and Food Inspection Directors - Eastern Region Meeting in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, June 3. 


Niu, Li, Brian D. Adam, James F. Campbell, and Frank Arthur. 2014. “Economics of Integrated Pest Management in Rice Processing Facilities.” Selected Presentation at 35th Meeting of the Rice Technical Working Group, February 18-21, New Orleans, LA.


Adam, Brian D., Michael D. Buser, Blayne Mayfield, Johnson Thomas, Ashwin Kumar, Krishna Palepu, Phil Crandall, and Steve Ricke. 2014. “Whole-Chain Traceability in Beef Production – Demonstrating the Technology.” Invited Presentation at the International Production and Processing Expo, AMI Education and Professional Development, Atlanta, GA, January 28. (Evaluation: Overall Session Content 5/5, Content applicable to my organization or job 4/5, Speaker 5/5). 


Crandall, Philip G., Corliss A. O’Bryan, Dinesh Babu, Nathan Jarvis, Mike L. Davis, Michael Buser, Brian Adam, John Marcy, and Steven C. Ricke. 2013. “Whole-chain traceability, is it possible to trace your hamburger to a particular steer, a U. S. perspective?” Meat Science. 95(2):137-44.


Gautam, S. G., G. P. Opit, K. L. Giles, and B. Adam. 2013. “Weight losses and germination failure caused by psocids in different wheat varieties.” J. Economic Entomology 106(1):491-498.


Burgos-Hernandez, A., et al. (2002). "Decontamination of aflatoxin B-1-contaminated corn by ammonium persulphate during fermentation." Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 82(5): 546-552.


Hagler, W. M., et al. (1982). "Destruction of Aflatoxin in Corn with Sodium Bisulfite." Journal of Food Protection 45(14): 1287-1291. 


Klockow, P.A. and K. M. Keener. 2009. "Safety and quality assessment of packaged spinach treated with a novel ozone-generation system," LWT - Food Science and Technology 42(2009): 1047-1053


Martin, C., T.J. Herrman, T. Loughin, and S. Oentong. 1997. Micropycnometer Measurement of Single-Kernel Density of Healthy, Sprouted, and Scab-Damaged Wheats. Cereal Chemistry 75(2):177-180.


Mendez-Albores, A., et al. (2007). "Decontamination of aflatoxin duckling feed with aqueous citric acid treatment." Animal Feed Science and Technology 135(3-4): 249-262.


Yang, C. Y. (1972). "Comparative Studies on Detoxification of Aflatoxins by Sodium Hypochlorite and Commercial Bleaches." Applied Microbiology 24(6): 885-890.


Shi, H. R. L. Stroshine and K. E. Ileleji. 201X. Aflatoxin Reduction in Corn by Cleaning and Sorting. Cereal Chemistry - Manuscript ID CCHEM-12-14-0268-R. Submitted on 12/31/2014.


Shi, H., R.L. Stroshine, and K. Ileleji. 2014. Aflatoxin Reduction in Corn by Cleaning and Sorting. ASABE Paper No.  _14-1890901_. St. Joseph, Mich. ASABE


Lu, L. and S. Gunasekaran. 2014. Nanomaterial-based electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of aflatoxins in grains. Presented at the IFT Annual Meeting, June 22-24 (Abstract No.:253-03), New Orleans, LA.


Boac, J.M., R.P. Kingsly Ambrose, M.E. Casada, R.G. Maghirang, and D.E. Maier. 2014. Applications of discrete element method in modeling of grain postharvest operations. Food Engineering Reviews 6(4): 128-149. 


Tilley, D.R., B. Subramanyam, M.E. Casada, and F.H Arthur. 2014. Stored-grain insect population commingling densities in wheat and corn from pilot-scale bucket elevator boots. Journal of Stored Products Research 59: 1-8.


Hurburgh, C. R.  2014.  Quality and Handling of the 2014 Iowa Crop.  Integrated Crop Management Newsletter.  Iowa State Extension and Outreach.  October 2, 2014. http://www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/2014/1002Hurburgh.htm


Hurburgh, C.R., Alison Robertson and Erin Bowers.  2014.  Update on 2014 Crop Quality. Integrated Crop Management Newsletter.  Iowa State Extension and Outreach.  October 15, 2014. http://www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/2014/1015Hurburgh.htm 


Hurburgh, C. R.  2014.  Pay Attention to Stewardship Requirements for Biotech Grains.  Integrated Crop Management Newsletter.  Iowa State Extension and Outreach.  October 28, 2014. http://www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/2014/1028Hurburgh.htm


Hurburgh, C. R.  2014.  Harvest 2014:  What We Know Now.  Proceedings of the 26th Annual Integrated Crop Management Conference.  Ames, IA.  December 3, 2014.  http://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/Proceedings-of-the-26th-Annual-Integrated-Crop-Management-Conference 


Shaw, A.M. 2014. FSMA and the grain industry: GEAPS Opening Session. GEAPS Exchange, Omaha, NB. February 2014.


Shaw, A.M. 2014. FSMA Impacts to the Ethanol Industry. 2014 Midwest Ethanol Plant Managers Meeting. February 2014.


Shaw, A.M. 2014. Implications of HACCP within food processing plants. HACCP short course, given April 17-19, 2014 at Iowa State University.


Hart, C.E. 2014. The Highs and Lows of Crop Marketing. Presented at the 2014 Integrated Crop Management Conference, Ames, Iowa, December 2014.


Hart, C.E. 2014. Grain Marketing and Risk Management Update. Presented at the 28th Annual Tri-State Agricultural Lenders Seminar, Dubuque, Iowa, October 2014.


Mosher, G.A. 2014. Integration of food safety plans with other operational goals. Part of the Current Issues in Grain Handling at GEAPS Exchange. February 2014. 


Parcell, J.L., W. Cain. “Ranking Specialty Crop Profitability: Iterative Stochastic Dominance.” To be presented at the Agriculture and Applied Economics Association. Minneapolis, MN, July 2014. 


Kojima, Yas, J.L. Parcell, and W. Cain. “Global Vegetable Oils Market Trends: Strategic Planning Initiatives.” To be presented at the Western Education and Research Activities (WERA) 72 Annual Meeting. Santa Barbara, California, 2014.


Shively, D.W. “The Market Effects of Low-Oligosaccharide Soybeans.” Southern Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX, February, 2014.


Cain, J.S., and J.L. Parcell. “An Empirical Analysis of Import Demand for U.S. Soybeans to the Philippines.” Southern Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX, February, 2014.


Parcell, J.L., and J.S. Cain. “Marginal Implicit Prices of Soybean Quality Attributes.” Southern Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting. Dallas, TX, February, 2014.


Kojima, Y., J.L. Parcell, and J.S. Cain. “A Demand Model of Vegetable Oil Markets in the U.S.A.” Southern Cain, J.S., and J.L. Parcell. “The Impact of Renewable Fuel Production on Soybean Oil Spatial Price Dynamics.” To be presented at the 2014 NCCC-134 Conference on Applied Commodity Price Analysis, Forecasting, and Market Risk Management, St. Louis, Missouri, April 21-22, 2014.


Cain, J.S., and J.L. Parcell. “Welfare Impacts of Introducing Drought-Tolerance Soybeans.” Poster presentation at the 2014 Agricultural and Applied Economics Association Annual Meeting. Minneapolis, Minnesota, July 2014.


Cain, J.S., and J.L. Parcell. “Marginal Implicit Prices of Soybean Quality Attributes.” Poster presented at the 10th Annual Soybean Biotechnology Symposium, National Center for Soybean Biotechnology, Columbia, Missouri, April 2014. 


Kojima, Yas, and J.L. Parcell. “Global Vegetable Oils Market Trends: Strategic Planning Initiatives.” Poster presented at the 10th Annual Soybean Biotechnology Symposium, National Center for Soybean Biotechnology, Columbia, Missouri, April 2014.


Huang, H., M.C. Danao, K.D. Rausch, and V. Singh. 2013. Diffusion and production of carbon dioxide in bulk corn at various temperatures and moisture contents. J. Stored Prod. Res. 55:21-26.


Huang, H., M.C. Danao, K.D. Rausch, and V. Singh. 2013. Diffusion and production of carbon dioxide in bulk corn at various temperatures and moisture contents. Lecture. ASABE Annual International Meeting, Kansas City, MO. Paper No. 131619395.


Paulsen, M.R., Pinto A.C.F., D.G. de Sena Jr., R. Zandonadi, S. Ruffato, A.G. Costa, V.A. Ragagnin, and M-G.C. Danao. Measurement of combine losses for corn and soybeans in Brazil. ASABE Paper No. 1570965, presented at 2013 ASABE Annual International Meeting, Kansas City, MO Jul, 2013.


C.L. Hardy. Developing a near infrared based quality control program for inbound ingredients at feed mills. Presentation given at the NC-213 Annual Meeting, February, 2013.


Cao. Accuracy at reduced cost for near infrared measurements of grain quality. Presentation given at the NC-213 Annual Meeting, February, 2013.


Cao. Calibration optimization and efficiency in near infrared spectroscopy. Doctoral dissertation. Iowa State University, Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering. May, 2013. 


Esteve Agelet, Lidia, Paul R. Armstrong, Jasper G. Tallada, Charles R. Hurburgh. 2013. Discrimination of Conventional and Roundup Ready Soybean Seeds. Differences between conventional and glyphosate tolerant soybeans and moisture effect in their discrimination by near infrared spectroscopy.  Food Chemistry 141 (2013) 1895–190.


Cao, N., Rippke, G., Hurburgh, C. R. 2013.  Effect of calibration subsets on standardization in NIR spectroscopy.  Oral Presentation for the 16th International Conference on Near Infrared Spectroscopy, La Grande-Motte (France), Jun. 2-7, 2013.


Hurburgh, C. R.  Economic considerations of NIR Spectroscopy.  Oral Presentation for the 16th International Conference on Near Infrared Spectroscopy, La Grande-Motte (France), Jun. 2-7, 2013.


Lidia Esteve Agelet and Charles R. Hurburgh. 2013. Limitations and Current Applications of Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Single Seed Analysis.  Talanta. (acc).


Ovando-Martínez, M., Ozsisli, B., Anderson, J.A., Whitney, K.L., Ohm, J.B., Simsek*, S. 2013. Analysis of deoxynivalenol and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside in Hard Red Spring Wheat inoculated with Fusarium graminearum. Toxins. 5: 2522-2532.


Simsek*, S., Ovando-Martínez, M., Ozsisli, B., Whitney, K.L., Ohm, J.B. 2013. Occurrence of deoxynivalenol and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside in hard red spring wheat grown in the USA. Toxins. 5: 2656-2670. 


Jones, C. and G. Dilawari. 2013. Non-destructive estimation of free fatty acid content and peroxide value using NIR spectroscopy in canola seed. Journal of Infrared Spectroscopy Status:  accepted for publication.


Dilawari, G. and C. Jones. 2013. Quantification of dockage in canola using flatbed scanner. Transactions of the ASABE 56(5):1-7.


Jones, C. L., 2013. Canola Aeration in Flat Storage Design for Zero Change Emissions, Producers Cooperative Oil Mill, Oklahoma City, OK.


Storing Canola in Oklahoma Summer Conditions, Ag Expo, Oklahoma City, OK, December 4, 2013


Figueroa, J. D. C., Hernández, Z. J. E., Rayas-Duarte, P., and Peña, R. J. 2013.  Stress relaxation and creep recovery tests performed on wheat kernels versus doughs: Influence of glutenins on rheological and quality properties.  Cereal Foods World 58(3):139-144. http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/CFW-58-3-0139.


Klockow, P.A. and K. M. Keener. 2009. "Safety and quality assessment of packaged spinach treated with a novel ozone-generation system," LWT - Food Science and Technology 42(2009): 1047-1053


Martin, C., T.J. Herrman, T. Loughin, and S. Oentong. 1997. Micropycnometer Measurement of Single-Kernel Density of Healthy, Sprouted, and Scab-Damaged Wheats. Cereal Chemistry 75(2):177-180.


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Land Grant Participating States/Institutions

AR, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, MS, MT, ND, NE, OK, TX

Non Land Grant Participating States/Institutions

USDA ARS, USDA-ARS, USDA-ARS/KS, USDA, ARS, USDA/ARS Grain Marketing and Production Research Center
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