NC_old7: Conservation, Management, Enhancement and Utilization of Plant Genetic Resources

(Multistate Research Project)

Status: Inactive/Terminating

NC_old7: Conservation, Management, Enhancement and Utilization of Plant Genetic Resources

Duration: 10/01/2012 to 09/30/2017

Administrative Advisor(s):


NIFA Reps:


Statement of Issues and Justification

The conservation, management and utilization of plant genetic resources, also known as germplasm, form the basis for harnessing genetic diversity to create and sustain agricultural production systems, necessary for economic security, and a stable and healthy society. Germplasm, both the genetic material (genes, groups of genes, chromosomes) that controls heredity and the tissues, organs and organisms that express the variation contained in that genetic material, provides the essential building blocks to ensure future improvements in production and quality, and for innovations in crop development and utilization. Diverse germplasm is crucial to our ability to continually refine cultivars, inputs, production systems, markets and end-use processes to respond to production challenges and to support changing societal needs, including for food, feed, fiber, bioenergy, and aesthetic uses. Genetic resources in combination with water, air, soil, minerals and crop management practices, define the agricultural production systems that sustain humanity. These resources comprise the essence of our environment and consequently, our quality of life by providing crucial ecological services and valued aesthetic qualities.


As the major grain production area in the world, the vitality of the agricultural system of the North Central Region (NCR) is crucial to global food security. Historically, many of the region's crops were not indigenous to the U.S. Diverse plant genetic resources for use in crop development and associated information is vital to ensure the continued productivity of this region, given ever changing environmental and societal needs. Production of corn and non-native crop species has helped the NCR become the world's major grain production area. Therefore, the health of the agricultural system of the NCR is crucial to global food security, and increasingly to security of U.S. energy production. Expanded use of crops for ethanol, biodiesel, or 'drop in' fuels is considered fundamental to U.S. security.


Increased diversification of crops that can be integrated into existing sustainable production systems without competing with acres devoted to food use, and that extend the period of capture of solar energy is a high priority; successful innovations will enhance the economic viability of producers and provide new market alternatives, and will support national rural development and environmental quality objectives. Areas within the NCR utilize plant diversity to different degrees in their agricultural production, some extensively; yet abiotic, biotic and market pressures threaten the profitability and therefore the sustainability of existing crop production. New species must also be evaluated for invasive potential, and appropriate risk assessments made concerning their introduction into new geographic areas.


Prior to the use of petroleum for energy production, society depended much more intimately on plant products for fuel and industrial feedstocks. Society is looking once again to agricultural-production solutions for its energy and industrial raw-material needs. The nation's maize collection, which comprises approximately one-third of the North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station's (NCRPIS) holdings, is a key resource for future energy security as well as for food and feed. Its oilseeds collections are explored for use in biofuel and industrial product applications as well as for food production.


Research and development related to the potential utilization of alternative plant species for energy production and for food, fuel, fiber, medicinal/nutriceutical, and biobased products are all increasing in priority. However, developing our understanding of selectable traits and the underlying genetic variation that can contribute to the above objectives is challenging.


Because water is a limiting factor for production in many areas of the globe as well as in the U.S., development of drought-tolerant varieties is an important objective. Production of crops for various purposes on marginally productive lands under current cropping systems continues to increase, threatening ecosystem and production system sustainability, and positive impacts on rural development are needed. Understanding how to manage and produce new crops is a complex task, and important in order to minimize economic and environmental risks and maximize benefits to producers, end-users and consumers. The Department of Energy actively engages NCR and other researchers in plant genetics, biochemistry, germplasm curators, agronomists and technologists to understand the energy potential of new and established crops. By using the products of plant genome sequencing efforts, researchers are integrating phenotypic, genomic, and metabolic information in order to understand gene function and expression in ways never before possible, enabling innovative uses of plant genetic resources and new impacts and benefits to society. It is said that biological discovery in the 21st century will be what biochemistry was to industrial development in the 20th century.


Diverse germplasm collections are developed and maintained at the NCRPIS, an element of the National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS). The NCRPIS has been partially funded by Regional (now Multi-State) Project NC-7 since 1947. The function of a germplasm collection is analogous to that of a library; researchers borrow its resources to develop and provide solutions for dietary and nutritional needs, biotic and abiotic production issues, phytoremediation and rehabilitation of disturbed environments, and to provide genetic diversity used for a wide array of basic plant research objectives. Researchers return repeatedly to the library as a source of allelic diversity of known provenance available for use as a public good. Shared research results increase the overall value of the library holdings for subsequent investigators who build upon previous discovery and invention. The NCRPIS was the first Regional Plant Introduction Station in the U.S., and has served as a major component of the network of 26 NPGS sites for the last 63 years. The NCRPIS provides plant genetic resources, associated information, and a wide variety of technical and leadership services devoted to substantially improving agricultural technology in the U.S. and abroad. In 2003, it was designated by the USDA-ARS as a mission-critical site.


Since 1954, the NCRPIS has coordinated a cooperative network involving the NCR's State Agricultural Experiment Stations, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and public gardens and arboreta to conduct long-term evaluations of promising new trees and shrubs. This network collects and summarizes performance data that shed light on plant-environment interactions and provide practical advice to landscape professionals. The NCR is an especially challenging region for the cultivation of trees and shrubs, with its climatic extremes, grassland soils, and increasing urbanization. And new biotic stresses caused by the rise of new pests and diseases, such as Emerald Ash Borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and more virulent strains of Dutch Elm Disease, present special challenges that can only be addressed by ensuring the ongoing availability of a diverse array of well-adapted landscape plants.


Because of the diversity of environments and needs in the North Central Region, and the diversity of research interests and expertise available, it is only logical and fitting that a multi-disciplinary effort utilizing the talents of all interested researchers be rigorously applied to develop and test potential solutions to these many challenges.


The impacts of successful germplasm conservation, management, enhancement and utilization can be measured in the introduction of economically viable new crops and cultivars and new uses for existing crops based on a thorough understanding of their traits and properties, including nutritional, chemical, pharmaceutical, industrial and aesthetic applications. Impact is also be made via contribution to the development of a fundamental understanding of the nature and biology of genetic diversity, how it interacts with and is influenced by environment, and the resulting discoveries, inventions and applications which benefit society. The researchers of the NCR and curatorial staff of the NCRPIS provide training for the next generation of plant scientists and curators, providing opportunity to sustain societal needs through agricultural innovation.

Related, Current and Previous Work

The Ames, IA NCRPIS germplasm conservation and management team includes six federal and four state scientists, an information technology specialist, a systems administrator, and technical team members who effectively collaborate to achieve mission objectives and goals. Technical and administrative support by five state and seventeen federal employees provides expertise and infrastructure for farm operations, viability testing, seed processing, greenhouse and facility management, laboratory, information management and analytical support. The team conserves germplasm and associated information and conducts research on the campus of Iowa State University in Ames, IA and at the nearby NCRPIS farm and headquarters facilities located on land owned by the Iowa State Agricultural Experiment Station. (Appendix Figure 1 provides organizational and staffing information.)

Each of the five curatorial teams interacts with the Program Manager, Research Plant Pathologist, Entomologist, Agronomist, and IT Specialist. Staff members work in cross-project teams, determined by their expertise and interests, to address issues that affect multiple curatorial or support teams, including: pollinator insect efficacy and management; detection, quantification and elimination of seed borne pathogens and pests; digital imaging standards and automation; georeferencing; enhancement of the internal and external (public) aspects of the Germplasm Resource Information Network (GRIN) database; development of software applications to improve quality and efficiency of phenotypic and genetic data capture; and a wide range of operational and equipment innovations which contribute to the quality of the germplasm accessions and associated information.

Reliable passport and provenance information, coupled with accurate taxonomic identification, are fundamental to the relevance of plant genetic resources (PGR) to specific research applications. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization and evaluation data greatly increase the value of the collections for research, allowing researchers to discriminate between elements of the collection and devote their resources to those most likely to fulfill their objectives. Large numbers of germplasm samples distributed to developing countries contribute to utilization in crop breeding programs, and the secondary benefits brought about through sharing this germplasm with other scientists (Smale et al., 2004). Demand has escalated dramatically for quality germplasm of known provenance over the past decade, and the trend is expected to continue, especially among scientists in developing countries.

Curatorial teams interact and collaborate with researchers at the National Center for Genetic Resource Preservation (NCGRP) at Ft. Collins, CO, the NPGS site for long-term seed storage which backs up the germplasm collections and conducts research related to germplasm viability and preservation of genetic profiles. These backup samples are held at -18 C or under liquid nitrogen (LN, vapor phase). At the NCRPIS, original samples are stored at -18 C separate from the distribution samples (or active collection) which are held at 4 C and 28% relative humidity (RH).

For the past four years, the USDA-ARS, the Global Crop Diversity Trust, and Bioversity International collaborated to develop the GRIN-Global System. Designed to provide the worlds crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use global plant genetic resource information management system, it will constitute the keystone for an efficient and effective global network of genebanks to permanently safeguard plant genetic resources vital to global food security, and to encourage the use of these resources by researchers, breeders, and farmer-producers. Project management and development leadership provided by NCRPIS staff, in conjunction with the staff of the Database Management Unit (DBMU) which administers the GRIN database in Beltsville, MD, and over 60 internationals who participated in testing enabled release to the international community in December, 2011. NCRPIS and DBMU staff will partner with the NPGS curatorial community to implement GRIN-Global in the U.S. to succeed the legacy GRIN system, and with the broader international germplasm community.

The NCRPIS specializes in the conservation and management of a diverse array of outcrossing, heterogeneous species (summarized in Figure 1), which require facilities and methodologies for controlled pollination. The project acquires, documents, conserves, maintains, freely distributes and enhances germplasm of agronomic and horticultural crops valued for food, feed, energy, industrial, landscape, and medicinal and/or nutriceutical purposes, and encourages their use in research and crop development. NCRPIS curators are responsible for 20,505 accessions of 1,924 taxa of 1,669 distinct plant species representing 344 genera from 173 countries, which serve as a rich resource to support the objectives of U.S. and global researchers.

Figure 1: NCRPIS Crop Assignments by Curator of 20, 505 Accessions
November, 2011




































Curators:

Ornamentals Brenner Medicinals Marek Millard Reitsma


Curatorial staff members regularly collaborate to exchange information and technological improvements with many other NPGS curators with whom they share many common objectives and goals, including germplasm exploration, regeneration, and characterization. NCRPIS curators and other scientists participate with researchers in the NCR and beyond to address crop development and improvement, invasive-species risk assessment, genetic enhancement and trait discovery, phytosanitary health issues, pollinator-biology questions, and many other objectives. The activities of the researchers who utilize PGR provide new sources of varieties with improved performance for yield, pest or abiotic stress resistance, contribute to human or animal health and nutrition, aesthetic value, biofuel and industrial applications, and provide value to consumers, producers and end users. Germplasm requests come from researchers in the private and public sectors concerned with applied and basic research applications, educators, historians, and members of the public interested in their use for improving their quality of life and health.

Every state in the NCR conducts germplasm research connected with Multi-State Research Project NC-7. A search of the Current Research Information System (http://cris.csrees.usda.gov/ ) for projects involving plant genetic resources (queried for plant introductions; plant genetic resources; germplasm; germplasm banks; plant breeding; plant genetics; 2007-2012) resulted in identification of 940 projects in the NCR, and 3500 Projects in the U.S. (Table 1.)

Table 1: North Central Region and USA CRIS Projects Involving Plant Genetic Resources


State/Region NIFA ARS TOTAL
IA 50 34 84
IL 60 56 116
IN 45 19 64
KS 79 18 97
MI 51 6 57
MN 51 27 78
MO 39 26 65
ND 61 44 105
NE 42 18 60
OH 45 11 56
SD 45 3 48
WI 67 43 110
North Central Region Total 635 305 940

Northeastern Region Total 363 167 530
Southern Region Total 757 368 1125
Western Region Total 592 283 875
International Collab. Total 0 30 30
Total USA CRIS Projects 2347 1153 3500

Acquiring new samples for the NPGS from domestic and international sources has become increasingly complicated and in some cases problematic. In contrast, acquiring samples from the NPGS in general has become easier because of computerized databases and communication, and more reliable and rapid long-distance transport. Consequently, the volume of NPGS samples distributed annually has expanded steadily, free of charge or restriction. NPGS distributions internationally will likely increase as international research programs that use plant genetic resources grow. Additional changes in NPGS holdings may occur in the future as the norms for international exchange of genetic resources evolve in concert with national and international trends in scientific research, and the evolution of access and benefit-sharing regimes (Bretting, 2007).

On average, NCR researchers annually received from the NPGS ca. 29% of its domestic germplasm distributions or 26% of total distributions (Appendix Table 1). More specifically, ca. 50% of all NCRPIS germplasm distributions are directed to NCR researchers (Appendix Table 2). Distributions from the NCRPIS have accounted for ca. 17% of all NPGS distributions for the past seven years (Appendix Table 2), although NCRPIS holdings make up only 9.5% of the NPGS collections, reflecting the overall importance of these holdings to agricultural research. The demand for PGR from all NPGS collections, although varying from year to year, continues to increase (Appendix Table 3). Demand for, and use of the resources, have been documented (16, 46).

Curators utilize opportunities to address issues and unknowns in taxonomy, and via collaboration with external expertise, utilize genetic and genomic technologies as well as morphological traits. Examples of this would include the separation of Amaranthus cruentus L. and Amararanthus caudatus L. (Costea, Brenner, et al., 2006), and description of new species such as Cucumis zambianus, as a result of collection from the nation of Zambia. A current taxonomic research collaboration of the researchers of the NCRPIS and the USDA-ARS in Madison, WI is designed to resolve the taxonomy of Daucus species. The taxonomy of the Umbelliferae presents unique challenges, and the crops included are important for food and culinary use.

Procedures and protocols to ensure maintenance of the original genetic profile during regeneration are tested to determine whether they indeed meet requirements. An example is the research of Cruz et al. (2008) to determine whether regeneration procedures for Brassica napus were sufficient to preclude pollen flow between cages of different varieties, utilizing a glyphosate marker. Marek (2008) extended the photoperiod control used for regeneration of photoperiod sensitive, tropical maize in order to induce earlier flowering in Helianthus argophyllus, thus enhancing seed regeneration capacity.

Molecular technologies are also being applied to determine the extent of genetic diversity in specific collections, and the feasibility of designating or modifiying existing core collections to represent maximum genetic diversity in a smaller set of accessions. The sunflower community has used a variety of molecular markers to assess diversity of this important oilseed crop; mostly recently the work of Mandel et al. (2011) utilized EST-SSRs to assess the diversity of the cultivated sunflower accessions. During 2010- 2011 the NCRPIS maize curation staff have collaborated with USDA-ARS researchers from Ames, IA, Columbia, MO, Ithaca, NY, Raleigh, NC to phenotype and genotype (Illumina genotyping by sequencing) all available maize inbred lines. A resource-intensive project, yet-to-be-published findings have already provided clarification regarding the diversity of the inbreds, relationships between lines, duplication, and in one case, mis-identification of lines provided by an originator.

The NC7 Ornamental Trials are the longest running ornamental evaluation trials in the US, entering their 58rd year in 2012. Focused on evaluating woody ornamental introductions for their adaptation to the NCR, aesthetic and productive qualities, NCR trial cooperators have identified important sources of ornamental germplasm for the horticultural industry (Widrlechner, 2004). Eight NCR states have CRIS Projects connected with the NC7 Ornamental Trials. Because of the successes that germplasm introductions have brought to the horticultural industry in the U.S., a new genebank for herbaceous ornamentals, the Ornamental Plant Germplasm Center (OPGC) was established at the Ohio State University (Tay et al, 2004). NCRPIS personnel worked closely with those of the OPGC to transfer technology, training, and methodology for germplasm management, and germplasm.

The NCR and other NC-7 participants directly benefit from use of the NPGS germplasm collections to accomplish research objectives, and active collaborations with the NCRPIS staff. The foci and applications of these efforts are highly diverse, reflecting the complexity of needs, environments, challenges and opportunities which NC-7 participants must address. The Literature Cited section of this proposal is divided into two parts, the first reporting publications directly cited in this proposal, and the latter part designed to capture the diversity of efforts for which space does not allow discussion.

Some of the applications and findings include the herbivory research of California participants (Karban, 2010; Karban and Shikori, 2010); the evaluation of loci that confer fitness of alleles for resistance to anthracnose of maize (Frey, 2011); transcriptional profiling of important production traits (i.e. cucumber, Ando and Grumet, 2010); research by Iowa researchers on poplar production to support biomass needs; agronomic research on new oilseed crops for biofuel or food production (Holman et al, 2011; Berti et al, 2009); study of the biomass yield and cell wall compositional components of corn, as influenced by planting density (Hansey et al., 2011); analyses of tomato production systems (Rivard et al., 2010); the impact of environment on wheat quality (Caffe-Treml et al., 2010); development of model organism databases to enable marker-assisted breeding (Iezzoni et al., 2010) and their application to marker assisted breeding in apples and cherries (Evans et. Al, 2010; Haldar et al., 2010); gene expression (Lin et al, 2010) and gene silencing phenomena (Flores et al., 2008) in soybean and other crops; cultivar evaluations by researchers of most Agricultural Experiment Stations (Stamm, 2010; Pavlista et al. 2011; Santra et al., 2010); development of improved breeding methods (Jumbo et al., 2011); selection for improved sweet corn seedling growth in cool temperatures (Viesselmann, 2008); analyses of the stability of nutritional components of tomato during production and storage (Gupta et al. 2010; Rubio-Diaz et al., 2010); and last, but not least, the release of new cultivars to provide unique value to producers, consumers and endusers (soybean, Missouri and wheat, Glover et al., 2010).

The perspectives contributed by the NC7 RTAC members, with their diverse experiences and research interests, are invaluable to developing an understanding of germplasms potential and value throughout the NPGS as well as supporting the development of NCRPIS priorities and capacities. Specific information about the RTACs function and organization is provided in the Methods and Organization / Governance sections.

Objectives

  1. Cooperate and participate as a key element in the NPGS, a coordinated national acquisition and management program of plant germplasm valued for agricultural, horticultural, environmental, medicinal and industrial uses in the NCR and throughout the U.S.
  2. Conserve seed and/or vegetative stock of more than 51,500 accessions of more than 1660 plant species.
  3. Within the NCR, throughout the U.S., and internationally, encourage the use of a broad diversity of germplasm to reduce crop genetic vulnerability. Provide viable plant genetic resources, information and expertise that foster the development of new crops and new uses for existing crops, and cultivar improvement of established crops, thus contributing to a sustainable, biobased economy.
  4. Contribute to understanding of plant-environment interactions, including risk assessment and communication of characteristics that differentiate a species' ability to adapt and whether it can serve as an economically viable crop or potentially become invasive in specific environments.
  5. Educate students, scientists and the general public regarding plant germplasm issues.
  6. Conduct research, and develop an institutional infrastructure needed to attain the preceding objectives efficiently and effectively, including advancements in software applications development to improve functionality and efficiency.

Methods

Methods The Multi-State Research Projects support four Regional Plant Introduction Stations, including the NCRPIS through the NC-7 Project, and help sustain major components of our national effort to provide germplasm and information for basic and applied research. Because of continuing needs for new and improved crops and for basic scientific research, the NC-7 Project is, by nature, a long-term effort. Changes in its organization and mission generally evolve gradually, but specific management procedures can change dramatically in response to the development of new technologies and research findings. The NCRPIS has led the NPGS in adoption of information management technologies, and uses its considerable expertise to advance genebank management information systems. With NC-7 support, the NCRPIS will continue to be the leading NPGS active site for managing heterozygous, heterogeneous, seed-propagated germplasm that generally requires controlled pollination, and for managing the requisite insect pollinators. The NC-7 Project has been effective because of its unique federal, state, and private-sector cooperation, essential to its future success. NC-7 funds provided approximately 20% of the projects monetary budget, not including ISUs substantial in-kind support, for the period 2007-2011, supporting up to 9 permanent state employees (three curators and their staff, the Program Manager and farm and facility support staff), and necessary equipment, travel and operating costs. These funds have resulted from a long-standing commitment from the State Agricultural Experiment Station (SAES) Directors of the NCRs land grant universities, who have provided funding taken off-the-top of the Multi-State Research Funds (MRF) received from the U. S. Department of Agricultures National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA-NIFA). This funding is critical to support state staff members, operational and equipment needs. The USDA/ARS provides approximately 80% of the NCRPIS budget (Appendix 1 and 2), including funds for salaries of many of the staff, general operations, and certain facilities and equipment. The National Germplasm Resource Lab (NGRL) provides funds for plant exploration and benefits to host countries. The State of Iowa, through the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station at Iowa State University (ISU), provides substantial in-kind and fiscal support in the form of land (100 acres), facilities, benefits and administrative services for ISU employees supported by regional funds, and other local assistance. Many other researchers and institutions in the U.S. actively manage germplasm as a component of their ongoing activities, but none has the total system approach of the NPGS. The NCRPIS demonstrates that fact particularly well. During the past 62 years, the NPGS and the NCRPIS in particular have built a coordinated structure and critical mass of trained curatorial and support staff, unparalleled within the United States. Individual states and the private sector lack such infrastructure and broad expertise. Some of the NPGSs major components are detailed in Appendix 3 and include: " The National Genetic Resources Advisory Council (NGRAC) " The National Plant Germplasm Coordinating Committees (NPGCC) " The Plant Germplasm Operations Committee (PGOC) " Forty-two Crop Germplasm Committees (CGCs) " The National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation (NCGRP) " The National Germplasm Resources Laboratorys (NGRL) " The North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station (NCRPIS) " The NC-7 Regional Technical Advisory Committee (RTAC) Methods to be utilized during 2012-2016 are described by objective: Objective 1: The NCRPIS will acquire and manage key germplasm and associated information needed to support agricultural, horticultural, environmental, medicinal and industrial uses. NCRPIS staff members will participate in and support plant exploration, often with NCR scientists, and manage the associated passport and descriptive information. CGC members contribute significantly to the development of acquisition priorities / plans, either through exploration or exchange with other germplasm preservation institutions. NCRPIS maintains a network of seed exchange relations within the U.S. (including non-governmental organizations, seed savers exchanges, and other federal agencies) and internationally. Explorations include scientists from the respective donor countries, whose technical expertise is critical to acquisition objectives, and who also provide valuable logistical and administrative support. The USDA-ARS funds international and domestic plant explorations designed to fill collection gaps identified by the crop curators and the 42 CGCs. About 15 explorations are conducted annually; germplasm and non-monetary benefits are shared with host countries (Williams, 2005). A review by A. Iezzoni (2005) of cherry germplasm acquisition strategy and implementation, and subsequent trait utilization from eastern and central European acquisitions details the determination of breeders to improve crops despite restrictive government policies and personal risks. The traits targeted for germplasm acquisition are as varied as the crops; efforts to collect carrot germplasm and relatives in the primary, secondary, and tertiary genepools support a broader objective, complete genetic and morphological characterization, and taxonomic revisions to Daucus, its relatives, and their place in the Apiaceae. In the case of ash trees, recent efforts focused on collection of Fraxinus specimens representing U.S. diversity. Destruction by the Emerald Ash Borer is described at: http://www.ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/Place/36251200/Ash_Project/HomePage.html . In the past 5 years, ornamental, oilseed, medicinal-plant, and other collecting trips were conducted by NCRPIS curators and their colleagues, and over 2,500 accessions were acquired. The collections grew by 4%, from 49,500 to 51,500 accessions. Availability has not increased due to the transfer of available accessions to other sites, incorporation of new germplasm from exploration and special collections, and limited resources available for regeneration. Future exploration trips are planned for vegetables, ornamentals, oilseeds, and other crops. Acquisition strategies target selected species, potential local exposure to pests, pathogens, and abiotic stresses, and sites most appropriate for research applications. Geographic Information System (GIS) tools, coupled with analysis of collection gaps for key taxa and regions, and available herbaria are used to support sound collection development strategies (Greene et al., 2005). Geopolitical events and national policies and laws greatly inhibit free and open germplasm access and exchange, and the highest acquisition priorities are not necessarily achievable at any given time (Williams, 2005). The Plant Exchange Office, an NGRL component, supports efforts in this area by providing knowledge and expertise required to secure international access, obtain collection permits, identify international collaborators, provide benefits to collaborating countries, and coordinate all aspects of exploration or exchange proposal development and partnerships. They identify in-situ conservation opportunities in host countries and work to help them conserve plant genetic resources. Their efforts are essential to ensuring successful expedition outcomes, and to the conservation and availability of freely accessible, well-documented plant genetic resources. Objective 2: The NCRPIS will continue to conserve seed and/or vegetative stock and associated information for more than 1,600 plant species. Regeneration and maintenance of the working species collections is required to increase both the proportion of the collections available to researchers and those backed up in long-term security storage at the NCGRP. From 2007-2011, over 14,800 accessions were tested for viability (29%), and over 5,400 grown for regeneration (Appendix 4). Approximately 75% of the collections are available, despite substantial regeneration efforts, due primarily to high germplasm demand, particularly for maize, resulting in annual distribution (Appendix 5) of 20-25% of the collection; continued acquisition of new germplasm which must be made available; and acquisition of valuable orphan collections from retiring researchers. Unavailable accessions may include those that were recently acquired and can be regenerated in Ames; regenerated in Ames only in greenhouse environments because of growth requirements, and/or the need to verify identity and prevent introduction of potentially invasive accessions; grown in other U.S. environments which can support regeneration needs; grown in tropical winter nursery sites or only in known, specific international environments; or are inviable, duplicates, or have small sample sizes. Curators frequently face challenges when determining appropriate regeneration strategies for materials that have not been grown or for which previous regeneration attempts were unsuccessful. Regeneration occurs in fields in Ames and at carefully selected collaborator sites, in greenhouses, and growth chambers (e.g., spinach is regenerated in positive pressure chambers in the USDA/ARS facility at Salinas, CA). Specific protocols are developed based on the biology of the species, photoperiod and vernalization requirements, and the need to produce high-quality seeds that preserve genetic integrity. They are documented in the NCRPIS Operations Manual. During regeneration, taxonomic identity is verified, genetic purity standards are maintained, and phytosanitary precautions are implemented to guard against distribution of pathogens. A wide range of pollination-control methods are utilized and refined to preserve the genetic integrity of diverse germplasm. Maize (Zea mays) and its relatives are increased via standard hand-pollination and isolation procedures to preclude fertilization by foreign pollen. Cucumbers, melons, squashes, brassicas, carrots and other insect-pollinated taxa are caged and bee- or fly-pollinated. Sunflower (Helianthus) accessions are pollinated by hand or in screen cages with insect pollinators to preclude pollen contamination. Other largely self-pollinating species (e.g., Panicum and Setaria millets) are open-pollinated in the field but caged to reduce bird predation, or grown in plastic tents in greenhouses (e.g., Amaranthus). Applied research efforts during the past five years have optimized use of non-stinging insect pollinators, such as the alfalfa leaf cutter bee (Megachile rotundata) and mason bee (Osmia cornifrons). These insects serve two positive functions, increased worker safety and financial savings compared to honeybees (Apis mellifera). Recent research to understand and overcome seed dormancy, after-ripening, and methods to increase germination rates of wild species are further detailed in this document. Additional research is needed to understand optimum seed storage conditions and viability protocols for many species. Objective 3: The NC-7 Project, through the NCRPIS staff, the RTAC members, and other NC-7 participants, will encourage use of genetic diversity to reduce crop genetic vulnerability. The NC-7 RTAC members and participating SAES scientists play an important role in raising awareness of the availability and potential benefits to be derived from use of plant genetic resources. Participation in professional societies and special events, through presentations and communications that are ultimately a source of information and research findings, and providing impetus for further investigation and applications. The NCRPIS will provide characterization and evaluation information to enhance the value and utility of its collections. Improvements in NCRPIS information management infrastructure over the past decade, to the capabilities of the GRIN database, and enhanced capabilities have linked information from many sources to the collections in novel ways. Information available to curators (and to the broader research community through web-access to GRIN) pertaining to their collections has increased and will continue to increase substantially during the next two years with the release and implementation of the GRIN-Global System, designed to succeed the current GRIN system. NCRPIS staff invested heavily in training, enabling effective and efficient information utilization, and concise delivery of quality, useful data and recommendations in a useable format. When feasible, information capture is integrated with ongoing regeneration activities. Appendix 4 illustrates the results of evaluation and characterization efforts for 2007-2011; over 134,000 observations were added on nearly 21,500 accessions to the GRIN database, and about 5,500 new images were added. Disease resistance evaluations, such as for the Cucumis (melon) collection for Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli ( Wechter, Block et.al, 2011) via a newly developed seed vacuum-infusion assay provided valuable data for use in crop improvement for breeding resistance to the bacterial fruit blotch pathogen. Reliable field and greenhouse methods were developed for screening of wild and cultivated sunflower for resistance to Sclerotinia (white mold). Molecular marker and other genetic characterization information are critical for developing a better understanding of the relationships of accessions among and within species, assessing genetic profiles, determining measures of diversity and evolutionary divergence, understanding where duplication exists, and providing sequence and marker information that can be associated with gene function and expression. Data demand is high; information availability enhances effective germplasm resource management. In the past five years, over 3,000 NCRPIS accessions were genetically characterized through research partnerships; opportunities to develop and acquire molecular-genetic information on key collections, particularly for maize, sunflower, vegetables, and key oilseeds species will continue to be sought. Real-time interoperability between the maize model organism database, MaizeGDB, and GRIN was accomplished. Maize researchers move between the systems to access information on stocks of interest or to request germplasm. NPGS curators and public users, together with the DBMU, work to identify additional features/functionality needs to be addressed in GRIN-Global to ensure interoperability with public genome databases, and ongoing development of standards and protocols for entry of genetic information. Curators survey literature to determine species and populations for which novel properties, characteristics or applications have been identified, and consult with relevant CGCs to develop priorities for, and participate in, characterization and evaluation activities. This information is crucial so the curators can acquire and maintain accessions best able to contribute to research and development. Identification of species of value for medicinal or nutraceutical needs was accompanied by consulting researchers and commercial experts to ensure that efforts are well focused. Collaborations to provide information for bioenergy and other industrial purposes contribute to a biobased economy. Incorporation of the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) CRIS Project into the NCRPIS brought opportunities to our maize evaluation, enhancement and utilization efforts for realizing the value of maize landraces. Funded by a separate research project since 2003, GEM activities have been gradually integrated into the NCRPIS operations. Evaluation and enhancement efforts involving a network of over 40 private and public collaborators resulted in release of 229 diverse lines to date, and continue to work towards realizing the potential of the maize collection (http://www.public.iastate.edu/~usda-gem/GEM_Project/GEM_Project.htm). Genetic research and variety development by NC7 participants encompasses a wide array of objectives. Research programs utilizing NCRPIS germplasm often engage collaborative research teams consisting of geneticists and plant breeders, and also entomologists, pathologists, biochemists and biotechnologists, biosystems engineers and soil scientists with the objective to develop plants with improved quality and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and new applications, thus benefiting U.S. agricultural and consumers. Some examples are detailed in Appendix 6. Objective 4: The NCRPIS will build on earlier research on understanding plant-environment interactions. Understanding adaptation and the genetic trait linkages which impact adaptation are important in utilizing unadapted germplasm. One of the best developed, long-term evaluation networks for testing woody plant adaptation in North America is the NC-7 Trials network. Much of the work is conducted by SAES personnel; data from these evaluations are useful for matching landscape plants with appropriate sites, and to identify climatic and edaphic factors that influence woody plant adaptation. This knowledge informs future acquisition and testing; a primary example is the development of the 1999 Ukraine exploration expedition and collections evaluation (Widrlechner, 2004). Recent examples (more detail in Appendix 7) include Fraxinus collection, at risk of extinction of North American ash populations by the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB); use of exotic maize genetic diversity for crop improvement; knowledge of genetic, climatic, and edaphic factors and their interactions which influence plant adaptation in the NCR is valuable for assessing risk of invasiveness for non-native species, and to develop more comprehensive risk-assessment models that integrate both biological attributes and geographic information to predict the likelihood of naturalization; development of new statistical approaches to predict the colonization of non-native plants, including crops, ornamentals and invasive weeds, by native insect herbivores; knowledge of plant-environment interactions to aid in determining the best sites for regeneration, management, and the choice of specific regeneration techniques; and private and public cooperator assistance with regeneration of Daucus, Spinacia and maize in key non-Ames environments. Objective 5: NCRPIS staff and NC7 RTAC members educate students, scientists and the general public regarding plant germplasm resource issues. They use outreach opportunities to present germplasm resource issues / accomplishments to the public, including primary, secondary, and collegiate classes and through post-graduate education. Information, analyses / interpretations are also presented via written publications, posters and oral presentations, and field days targeted for scientific, industry, and popular audiences. In order to increase recognition for the scholarly contributions of curators to researchers efforts and to promote understanding of what the NPGS provides, curators have requested co-authorship of manuscripts resulting from their contributions, when appropriate. Because of close associations with Iowa State University, we frequently provide tours and lectures for ISU students and visitors from other institutions and professional groups, and opportunities to provide film footage for documentaries. We provide tours for individuals of diverse interests, ranging from K-12 students to nursery professionals and international officials, meeting forums for groups (i.e. the Iowa Honey Producers) and outreach to science classes. We advise graduate students, offer internships and participate in collaborative research. All NC7 participating institutions provide extensive opportunities for outreach and education. For example, Texas A&M University continues significant efforts in their educational programs to share the value of germplasm to development of improved crop cultivars. TAMU programs include annual field days and production tours with more than 500 total attendees, and direct classroom curricula that reached more than 100 graduate students in 2011 alone. A weekly informal seminar, developed to focuses on germplasm and its utilization, is well-attended. Objective 6: The NCRPIS will conduct research and develop institutional infrastructure needed to attain the preceding objectives, including advancements in software to improve functionality and efficiency. Improvements to seed drying and processing have been completed; development of viability testing methods will continue. Purchase of a thermal gradient table facilitated development of viability testing protocols for many taxa which lack such standardized methods. Recent efforts to evaluate the applicability of PCR methods versus established ELISA test methods for detection of seed-borne Pantoea stewartii (Block, Shepherd, et.al, to be published) and to devise or determine appropriate phytosanitary testing protocols and standards required to ensure adequate protection of the international maize seed trade, remind us of the importance of utilizing sound science and effective community communications. New software applications developed in-house resulted in a pollinator insect delivery and management program, a web-interface for NC-7 ornamental trial collaborators to transfer evaluation data, and Pocket Actions which enables curatorial staff to capture progress of workflows directly to the database, facilitating planning and monitoring. During 2008-2011, NCRPIS personnel provided leadership for the development of the GRIN-Global System, a joint effort of the USDA-ARS, the Global Crop Diversity Trust, and Bioversity International to develop a genebank information management system that is database-flexible, supports five major languages, and is free of recurring licensing fees. Extensive training of international curators is ongoing, with U.S. implementation planned for 2012-2013.

Measurement of Progress and Results

Outputs

  • Plant explorations and exchanges will continue to address taxonomic gaps and provide needed representation in collections of crop species and their relatives and serve as a source of new collections for research and crop improvement, supporting agricultural success.
  • Seed and plant viability will be monitored to ensure collection health. Methods and protocols will be developed as needed.
  • Analytical and diagnostic methods to detect plant pathogens will be developed and deployed to ensure the health of plants being regenerated, and that healthy plant propagules are distributed.
  • Regenerations will continue to focus on providing researchers with a diverse array of PGR, true to their original genetic profile, as a source of genes and gene products. NCRPIS has steadily increased the number of accessions available to researchers, with 75% of the collection available compared to 73% in 2007, despite a net gain of nearly 1,730 accessions. This reflects high demand, as well as a need to provide additional regeneration resources. Regeneration backlogs are an obstacle to increasing evaluation and characterization efforts that provide valuable information about the collections, and are limited by greenhouse facilities and our ability to provide a short day growing environment for photoperiod sensitive germplasm. Many CGCs cite availability as a primary limitation to evaluation and characterization efforts (40). Partial availability also stymies systematic studies to evaluate or characterize materials in a common temporal and spatial environment.
  • Insect-pollinator research will continue to be an important focus, providing needed resources for curatorial program success, and contributing to improved worker safety.
  • Output 6: Phenotypic, phenological and genetic characterization and evaluation information will be made available to researchers to facilitate their objectives and provide for well-targeted use of PGR, particularly for sunflower, maize, carrot, and the oilseed Brassicaceae of interest for biofuel applications. Requestors frequently express the need for more evaluation information, especially related to maturity and adaptation, followed by biotic and abiotic stress resistance, to better target their efforts. Addition of standardized descriptors for many crops will enable more information to be made available. Output 7: Software applications will be developed and deployed to increase the productivity and efficiency of the NCRPIS, and be provided to other elements of the NPGS for their use. In conjunction with implementation of the GRIN-Global System by the NPGS in the near future, a web-based Accession Performance Reporting (APR) application will be developed to facilitate capture of information and results from research users of the germplasm, add these data to GRIN-Global or other appropriate databases, further increasing the probability of realizing their potential value and assessing impacts from their use. Output 8 Distributions of plant germplasm will support the U.S. and international researchers. Output 9 The proportion of the collection backed up at the NCGRP remained at 79% from 2007-2011 (Table 2 and Appendix Table 6). Additional progress must be made in order to help ensure collection security. Table 2: NCRPIS Collection Size, Availability and Back-up Progress Number of Percent Number Percent Year Accessions Available Available Backed-up 2011 a 51,701 75 38,803 79 2007 49,971 73 36,479 79 2006 48,493 66 32,005 78 2001 47,098 68 32,026 74 1997 44,000 59 25,960 61 1993 41,000 38 15,580 34 a as of November, 2011

Outcomes or Projected Impacts

  • As demand for plant genetic resources for research use increases, the positive impacts of their use will also increase through the activities of the NC-7 Participants. Availability of well-documented, well-characterized, unencumbered PGR of known provenance is a key component contributing to increasing biological knowledge, agricultural success, a biobased economy, and improved health and well-being. As new evaluation and characterization information is made available, the value of the PGR increases, and increased interest in their use follows (16). As we interact with researchers, CGCs and other crop research experts, we try to exchange information that helps us better anticipate future challenges and research needs.
  • Providing PGR to educators for classroom purposes provides a useful service and raises awareness of students and the general public to the importance of PGR and their impact on daily life.
  • Activities related to acquisition, documentation, characterization, maintenance, evaluation, documentation and distribution of PGR are ongoing. Given sufficient resources and a slower rate of growth in accession numbers, we expect that the collection will be 77% available and 83% backed up within five years, and 90% backed up within ten years. Unforeseen resource restrictions or acquisition opportunities may impact these estimates.
  • Genetic characterization, trait evaluations, next generation sequencing techniques and trait association analyses will support use of germplasm research to identify unique, valuable traits and or sequences, contribute to our understanding of the nature of biological diversity, and provide opportunities to translate findings into unique value for societys benefit.
  • Continued refinement of risk-assessment models which predict potential invasiveness of introduced species will support informed decisions relative to introduction of new plant species to the U.S.
  • Outcome 6: Software application development will support continued gains in productivity, efficiency, and information capture. As information needs increase, research activities and technologies directed towards meeting, managing and integrating tools to enable powerful insights and practical solutions are of high value. Outcome 7: Release of new varieties and new knowledge from research programs using PGR will facilitate sustainable agricultural productivity and economic security. outcome 8: Use of plant genetic resources in research and germplasm distributions will continue to support agronomic, genetic, molecular biology, plant pathology, entomological, horticultural, ecological, biochemical, industrial, anthropological, medical and pharmaceutical, animal nutrition, and bioenergy research. Their use will continue to contribute to the aesthetics and the sustainable management of the world we live in, and the health, welfare and security of the worlds peoples.

Milestones

(2012): 1) Collaborative acquisition in Tunisia, Morocco, Republic of Georgia and elsewhere; 2) Identification of environments and collaborators to support the regeneration of tropical highland maize; 3) Incorporating genetic/genomic information on NCRPIS collections in GRIN-Global; 4) Genetic characterization and phenotypic evaluation of the Daucus collection, collaboration in the development of a taxonomic treatment of Daucus

(2013): 1) Deployment of the GRIN-Global System in the NPGS, successor to the legacy GRIN System; 2) Oilseed germplasm acquisition from the Republic of Georgia; 3) Development of a web-interface to enable NC-7 ornamental trial collaborators to transfer evaluation data via the web. 4) Publication of a statistical model for estimation of longevity of seed in storage; 6) Distribution of the collections to researchers and educators is expected to comprise 20-25% of the holdings each and every year.

(2014): 1) Development and implementation of an Accession Performance Reporting (APR) system to track impact from germplasm distributions, in collaboration with the DBMU which administers the GRIN database; 2) Development of applications and protocols for the capture of morphometric data from images.

(2015): Assessment of implemented APR system.

(2017): Collection size may have grown by an estimated 1% annually, to reach approximately 55,700 accessions. Given continued support, the collections should be approximately 75% available and 82% backed up

(12):16: We will use the NC7 Review Process and internal benchmarks and accountability systems annually and integrate the information used to assess our progress and better meet future needs. Our NCRPIS Operations Manual will be updated to reflect changes resulting from these processes. Specifically, we will use the following vehicles to assess progress and report results: " ongoing ARS Program 301 OSQR Review and CSREES Project Review & Renewal processes; " working with 12 CGCs to update crop status reports for NPGS; " annual meetings and on-going discussions with the NC-7 RTAC to report on progress, develop better understanding of ongoing research and development needs to which our curators and scientists can significantly contribute, and to seek guidance in planning future activities and directions; " annual AD-421 reports for both ARS and CSREES made readily available through our website; " station annual reports posted to our website, http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=36-25-12-00; " specialized computer applications for electronically capturing information from APRs to better measure progress, results and impacts.

Projected Participation

View Appendix E: Participation

Outreach Plan

The NC-7 Project, through NCRPIS staff, the RTAC members, and participants, will encourage use of genetic diversity to reduce crop genetic vulnerability. The NC-7 RTAC members and participating SAES scientists can play an important role in raising awareness of the availability and potential benefits to be derived from use of plant genetic resources. These individuals, by participating in professional societies and special events in either their home institutions or beyond, through presentations and professional or popular press communications, are ultimately a source of information and research findings that provide the impetus for further investigation and applications.

NCRPIS, through characterization and evaluation activities, will continue to provide information to enhance the value and utility of its collections. Significant improvements have been achieved in our information-management infrastructure over the past decade; one aspect of the unique potential of the GRIN-Global System is the capacity to participate in and utilize international community development to enhance not only the system itself, but our ability to link information from many sources to the collections in novel ways. Improved interoperability of the genomics databases will facilitate utilization of PGR. Information pertaining to their collections is currently available to curators, to the broader research community, and the general public through web-access to GRIN, and through linked databases such as MaizeGDB. The amount of available information has increased greatly since the last revision and this trend is expected to continue at an ever increasing rate.

NC7 participants take advantage of outreach opportunities to present germplasm resource issues and accomplishments to the public, including primary, secondary, and collegiate classes and through involvement with post-graduate education. Information, analyses and interpretations are also presented via field days, grower meetings, written publications, posters and oral presentations targeted for scientific, industry, and popular audiences, documenting and thus promoting understanding of what the NPGS provides and research achievements and applications. Because of the close physical and intellectual associations with Iowa State University, the NCRPIS frequently provides tours and lectures for ISU students and visitors from other U.S. and international institutions.

In addition to these efforts, the NCRPIS conducts tours and readily explains its work to some 400-800 individuals each year ranging from second grade students to senior national and international officials responsible for the health and vitality of their countrys agriculture. We provide tours for individuals of diverse interests, ranging from elementary students to nursery professionals and national and international officials responsible for the health of their nations agricultural systems, and meeting forums for such groups as the Iowa Honey Producers, the International Commission on Plant-Bee Relationships, etc. We advise graduate students, offer internships and participate in collaborative research partnerships.

Organization/Governance

The NC-7 Regional Technical Committee is made up of a representative from each of the Agricultural Experiment Stations of the North Central Region, along with ex-officio representatives from the USDA-ARS National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, the USDA-ARS National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, the NPGS Plant Exchange Office, and ARS and CSREES National Program Leaders, and the ARS Midwest Area Director. The Dean of Iowa State Universitys College of Agriculture currently serves as the Administrative Advisor, and the Research Leader of NCRPIS serves as the NC-7 Project Coordinator. RTAC officers include a chair, secretary, and a past-chair. The secretary typically is elected to a one-year term and becomes the chair the following year. Each year, NCRPIS staff members report results and progress, discuss issues and receive guidance from the RTAC. The project curators also report to and participate in meetings with each of the 12 pertinent Crop Germplasm Committees (Maize, Medicinal and Aromatic, New Crops, Root and Bulb Vegetable, Leafy Vegetables, Woody Landscape Plants, Herbaceous Ornamentals, Crucifer, Clover and Special Purpose Legumes, Turf and Forage Grass, Cucurbit, and Sunflower) which provide crop-specific expertise to the NPGS. RTAC members and other NC-7 Participants share research findings, institutional objectives and relevant issues, and serve as communication liaisons with their Ag Experiment Station Directors, institutional leadership, and faculty.

Literature Cited

Part I: Cited in this document:

Ando, K., and Grumet, R. 2010. Transcriptional profiling of rapidly growing cucumber fruit by 454-pyrosequencing analysis. J Amer Soc Hortic Sci. 135:291-302.

Berti, M., Wilckens, R., Fischer, S., Solis, A., Gonzalez, W., and Johnson, B.L. 2009. Seeding date influence on camelina seed yield, yield components, and oil content in Chile. In Annual meeting abstracts 14-19 Nov. Gran Hotel Termas de Chillan, Chile. Available at http://www.aaic.org/ (verified 18 Dec. 2009) Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops, Ames, IA.

Bretting, P.K. 2007. The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System in an Era of Shifting International Norms for Germplasm Exchange. Acta Hort. (ISHS) 760:55-60.
http://www.actahort.org/books/760/760_5.htm.

Caffe-Treml, M., Glover, K.D., Krishnan, P., and Hareland, G.A. 2010. Variability and Relationships Among Mixolab, Mixograph, and Baking Parameters Based on Multi-Environment Spring Wheat Trials. Cereal Chemistry 67:574-580.

Costea, M., Brenner, D.M., Tardif,F.J., Tan, F.Y., and Sun, M. 2006. Delimitation of Amaranthus cruentus L. and Amaranthus caudatus L. using micromorphology and AFLP analysis: an application in germplasm identification. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution. 53(8):1625-1633. doi: 10.1007/s10722-005-2288-3.
Cruz, V.M.V., Rife, C.L., Nason, J.D., Brummer, E.C., and Gardner, C.A.C. 2008. Measuring the effectiveness of isolation of Brassica napus L. accessions during caged germplasm regeneration. Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter. 154:14-19.

Flores, T., Karpova, O., Su, X., Zeng, P., Bilyeu, K., Sleper, D.A., Nguyen, H.T., Zhang, Z.J. (2008). Silencing of GmFAD3 gene by siRNA leads to low alpha-linolenic acids (18:3) of fad3-mutant phenotype in soybean [Glycine max (Merr.)]. Transgenic Res. 10.1007/s11248-008-9167-6

Frey, T.J., Weldekidan, T., Colbert, T., Wolters, P.J.C.C., and Hawk, J.A. 2011. Fitness Evaluation of Rcg1, a Locus which Confers Resistance to Colletotrichum graminicola (Ces.) G.W.Wils., using Near-Isogenic Maize (Zea mays L.) Hybrids. Crop Sci. 51: advance online copy at doi: 10.2135/cropsci2010.10.0613.

Germplasm Enhancement of Maize Project Homepage: http://www.public.iastate.edu/~usda-gem/.

Glover, K.D., Rudd, J.C., Devkota, R.N., Hall, R.G., Jin, Y., Osborne, L.E., Ingemansen, J.A., Rickertsen, J.R., Baltensperger, D.D., and Hareland, G.A. 2010. Registration of "Brick" Wheat. Journal of Plant Registrations, Vol.4, No.1. 22-27.

Gupta, R., Balasubramaniam, V.M., Schwartz, S.J., Francis, D.M. 2010. Storage stability of lycopene in tomato juice subjected to combined pressure-heat treatments. J Agric Food Chem. 58(14):8305-8313.

Greene, S.L., Hannan, R., Afonin, A., Dzyubenko, N.I., and Khusainov, A. 2005. Collecting wild crop relatives in the northwestern steppes of Kazakhstan. Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter. Bulletin des Ressources Phytogenetiques (IPGRI-FAO) Notariciaro de Recursos Fitogeneticos (IPGRI-FAO). 141:1-6.

Haldar, S., Haendiges, S., Edge-Garza, D.A.,Oraguzie, N., Olmstead, J.W., Iezzoni, A., and Peace, C. 2010. Applying genetic markers for self-compatibility in the WSU Sweet Cherry Breeding Program. Acta Horticulturae. 859:375-380.

Hansey, C.N and de Leon, N. 2011. Biomass yield and cell wall composition of corn (Zea mays L.) with alternative morphologies planted at variable densities. Crop Sci. 50:1005-1015.

Holman, J., Maxwell, S., Stamm, M., and Martin, K. 2011. Effects of planting date and tillage on winter canola. Crop Management doi:10.1094/CM-2011-0324-01-RS.

Iezzoni, A. 2005. Acquiring Cherry Germplasm from Central and Eastern Europe. Hort. Science. 40(2)304-308.

Iezzoni, A., Luby, J., Yue, C., McFerson, J., van de Weg, E., Fazio, G., Main, D., Bassil, N., Peace, C., and Weebadde, C. 2010. RosBREED Project Brochure.

Iezzoni, A., Luby, J., Yue, C., van de Weg, E., Fazio, G., Main, D., Bassil, N., Weebadde, C., McFerson, J., and Peace, C. 2010. RosBREED: Enabling marker-assisted breeding in Rosaceae. Acta Horticulturae. 859:389-394.

Jumbo, M.B., Weldekidan, T., Holland, J.B., and Hawk, J.A. 2011. Comparison of Conventional, Modified Single Seed Descent and Doubled Haploid Breeding Methods for Maize Inbred Lines Development using GEM Breeding Crosses. Crop Sci. 51:1534-1543.

Karban, R. 2010. Neighbors affect resistance to herbivory - a new mechanism. New Phytologist. 186:564-566.

Karban, R., and Shiojiri, K. 2010. Identity recognition and plant behavior. Plant Signaling and Behavior. 5:854-855.Lin, R., Glazebrook, J., Katugari, F., Orf, J.H., Gibson, S.L. 2010. Identification of genes differentially expressed between developing seeds of different soybean varieties. BMC Plant Biology 10:278.

Mandel, J.R., Dechaine, J.M., Marek, L.F., and Burke, J.M. 2011. Genetic diversity and population structure in cultivated sunflower and a comparison to its wild progenitor, Helianthus annuus L. Theor Appl Genet (2011). 123:693704. DOI 10.1007/s00122-011-1619-3

Marek, L.F. 2008. Promoting Flowering in Helianthus argophyllus: Manipulating Daylength in the Field. http://hdl.handle.net/10113/34680.

North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station Repository Homepage: http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=36-25-12-00.

Pavlista, A.D., Santra, D.K., Isbell, T.A., Baltensperger, D.D., Hergert, G.W., Krall, J., Mesbach, A., Johnson, J., O'Neill, M., Aiken, R., and Berrada, A. 2011. Adaptability of Irrigated Spring Canola to the US High Plains. Industrial Crops and Products 33 (1):165-169.

Rivard, C.L., Sydorovych, O., OConnell, S., Peet, M.M., Louws, F.L. 2010. An Economic Analysis of Two Grafted Tomato Transplant Production Systems in the United States. Hort. Technology 20:794-803.

Rubio-Diaz, D.E., Santos, A., Francis, D.M., Rodriguez-Saona, L.E. 2010. Carotenoid stability during production and storage of tomato juice made from tomatoes with diverse pigment profiles measured by infrared spectroscopy. J Agric Food Chem. 58(15):8692-8698.

Santra D. K., Plyler-Harveson, R., Harvey, S., Reddy, S., and Frickel, G. 2010. "Genetic characterization of proso millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) germplasm". Proceedings of ASA-CSSA-SSSA 2010 International Annual Meeting. Long Beach, CA. October 31- November 4, 2010. p. 118.

Smale, M. and Day-Rubenstein, K. 2002. The Demand for Crop Genetic Resources: International Use of the US National Plant Germplasm System. World Development. 30(9):1639-1655.

Stamm, M. 2010. Kiowa Canola. Kans. Ag. Exp. St. and Coop. Ext. Ser., Manhattan, KS. L-928.

Tay, D., M.P. Widrlechner, and J.L. Corfield. 2004. Establishment of a new genebank for herbaceous ornamental plants. FAO/IPGRI/ Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter 137:26-33.

Viesselmann, L.M. 2008. Recurrent selection for seedling growth in cool temperatures in sweet corn (Zea mays L.) Thesis. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.

Wechter, W.P., Levi, A., Ling, K-S., Kousik, C., and Block, C. 2011. Identification of Resistance to Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli among Melon (Cucumis spp.) Plant Introductions. Hort Science. 46(2):207-212.

Widrlechner, M.P. 2004. Insights into woody plant adaptation and practical applications. METRIA Proceedings Vol. 13. Published on the Internet at: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/nursery/metria/metria13/widrlechner/index.html.

Widrlechner, M.P., Kirkbride, J.H., Ghebretinsae, A.G., and Reitsma, K.R. 2008. Cucumis zambianus (Cucurbitaceae), a New Species from Northwestern Zambia. Systematic Botany. 33(4):732-738. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1600/036364408786500154.

Williams, K. 2005. An Overview of the U.S. National Plant Germplasm Systems Exploration Program. Hort. Science. 40(2):297-301.


Part II  Relevant Literature Associated with NC-7 Participation

North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station

Peer Reviewed:
Cruz, V.M.V., Rife, C.L., Nason, J.D., Brummer, E.C., and Gardner, C.A.C. 2008. Measuring the effectiveness of isolation of Brassica napus L. accessions during caged germplasm regeneration Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter. 154:14-19.

Cruz, V.M.V., Luhman, R., Rife, C.L., Shoemaker, R.A., Marek, L.F., Brummer, E.C., and Gardner, C.A. 2007. Characterization of flowering time and SSR marker analysis of annual and winter type Brassica napus germplasm. Euphytica. 153:43-57.

Cyr, P.D., Weaver, B., Millard, M.J., Gardner, C.A., Bohning, M.A., Emberland, G.P., Sinnott, Q.P., Kinard, G.R., Postman, J.D., Franco, T., Mackay, M., Guarino, L., and Bretting, P.K. 2009. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System. Proceedings American Society of Horticultural Sciences. Hort. Science. 44(4):1179.

Jiang, H., Campbell, M., Blanco, M., and Jane, J. 2010. Characterization of maize amylose-extender (ae) mutant starches: Part II. Structures and properties of starch residues remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis at boiling-water temperature. Carbohydrate Polymers. 80(1):1-12.

Jiang, H., Horner, H., Pepper, T., Blanco, M., Campbell, M., and J. Jane. 2010. Formation of elongated starch granules in high-amylose maize. Carbohydrate Polymers. 80(2):534-539.

Kovach, D.A., Widrlechner, M.P., and Brenner, D.M. 2010. Variation in seed dormancy in Echinochloa and the development of a standard protocol for germination testing. Seed Sci. and Technol. 38:559-571.

Lopez, P.A., M.P. Widrlechner, P.W. Simon, S. Rai, T.D. Boylston, Isbell, T., Bailey, T.B., Gardner, C.A., and Wilson, L.A. 2008. Assessing phenotypic, biochemical, and molecular diversity in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) germplasm. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution. 55:247-275.

Mandel, J.R., Dechaine, J.M., Marek, L.F., and Burke, J.M. 2011. Genetic diversity and population structure in cultivated sunflower and a comparison to its wild progenitor, Helianthus annuus L. Theor Appl Genet (2011). 123:693704. doi: 10.1007/s00122-011-1619-3.

Marek, L.F. 2008. Promoting Flowering in Helianthus argophyllus: Manipulating Daylength in the Field. http://hdl.handle.net/10113/34680.

Qu, L., Widrlechner, M.P., and Rigby, SM. 2010. Analysis of breeding systems, ploidy, and the role of hexaploids in three Hypericum perforatum L. populations. Industrial Crops and Products. 32:1-6.

Seiler, G.J., Gulya, T.J., and Marek, L.F. 2006. Exploration for wild Helianthus species from the desert Southwestern USA for potential drought tolerance. Helia. 29(45):1-10. doi:10.2298/HEL0645001S.
Srichuwong, S., Gutsea, J., Blanco, M.H., Duvick, S.A., Gardner, C.A., and Jane, J. 2010. Characterization of Corn Grains for Ethanol Production. Journal of ASTM International. 7(2):1-10.

Volk, G.M., Crane, J., Caspersen, A.M., Kovach, D.A., Gardner, C.A., and Walters, C.T. 2007. Hydration of Cuphea seeds containing crystallized triacylglycerols. Functional Plant Biology. 34:360-367.

Wechter, W.P., Levi, A., Ling, K-S., Kousik, C., and Block, C. 2011. Identification of Resistance to Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli among Melon (Cucumis spp.) Plant Introductions. Hort Science. 46(2):207-212.

Widrlechner, M.P., Kirkbride, J.H., Ghebretinsae, A.G., and Reitsma, K.R. 2008. Cucumis zambianus (Cucurbitaceae), a New Species from Northwestern Zambia. Systematic Botany. 33(4):732-738. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1600/036364408786500154.

Non-Peer Reviewed:
Ayala-Diaz, I.M., Gardner, C.A., Isbell, T., Marek, L., and Westgate, M. 2010. Effect of temperature gradients on germination of pennycress germplasm. (abstract) 2010 Association for the Advancement of Industrial Crops Annual Meeting, 09/18-22/2010, Ft. Collins, CO.

Ayala-Diaz, I.M., Gardner, C.A., Isbell, T., Marek, L., and Westgate, M. 2010. Variations in fatty acid composition and oil content in camelina germplasm. (abstract) 2010 ASA-CSSA-SSSA International Annual Meeting, Longbeach, California, 10/30-11/04/2010.

Cyr, P.D. , Weaver, B.E. , Millard, M.J., Gardner, C.A., Bohning, M.A., Emberland, G., Sinnott, Q.P., Kinard, G.P., Franco, T., Mackay, M., Guarino, L., and Bretting, P.K. 2010. GRIN-Global: An international project to develop a global plant genebank and information management system. (Abstract P800). Plant and Animal Genome XVII Conference Abstracts, San Diego, CA, 01/10-14/2010.

Gulya, T., Marek, L.F., and Gavrilova, V. 2010. Disease resistance in cultivated sunflower derived from public germplasm collections. Plenary talk/Proceedings of the International Symposium Sunflower Breeding on Resistance to Diseases, Krasnodar, Russia, June 23-24, 2010, sponsored by the All-Russia Research Institute of Oil Crops (VNIIMK) and the International Sunflower Association.

Marek, L.F. 2010. Plant Exploration Final Report: 2009 Plant Exploration in the South Central United States to collect Sunflower Germplasm for Crop Improvement. Plant Exchange Office, National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD.

Medic, J., Abendroth, L., Elmore, R., Blanco, M.H., and Jane, J. 2010. Effect of planting date on cornstarch structures and properties. (abstract) American Assocation of Cereal Chemists Annual Meeting, Savannah, GA, O10/24-27/2010.

Sandhu, S., Barb, J., Gracom, K. Sykes, R., Moyers, B., Davis, M., Rieseberg, L., Marek, L., Burke, J., and Knapp, S. 2010. Genomic analysis of wood production in sunflower. (abstract 208-2). 2010 ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA, 10/31-11/04/2010.

Smelser, A.D., Brenner, E., Vanous, A., Blanco, M.H., Lubberstedt, T., Frei, U., and Gardner, C.A. 2010. Maize haploid induction and doubling, recent experience with exotic and elite maize populations. (abstract 89-10). 2010 ASA-CSSA-SSSA International Annual Meeting, Longbeach, CA. 10/30-11/04/2010.

Widrlechner, M.P. 2010. Building a comprehensive collection of ash germplasm. (abstract) 4th Global Botanic Gardens Congress, Dublin, Ireland, 05/13-18/2010. Conference Program and Book of Abstracts. P. 114-115.

Widrlechner, M. P., Reitsma, K.R., Clark, L.D., and Kirkbride, Jr., J.A. 2009. Length and rapid elongation of pedicels of the female flowers of Cucumis anguria L. Cucurbit Genetics Cooperative Report. 31/32: 36-40 and back cover.


California

Peer Reviewed:
Arimura, G., Shiojiri, K. and Karban, R. 2010. Acquired immunity to herbivory and allelopathy caused by airborne plant emissions. Phytochemistry. 71:1642-1649.

Heil, M. and Karban, R. 2010. Explaining the evolution of plant communication by airborne signals. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 25:137-144.

Karban, R. 2010. Neighbors affect resistance to herbivory - a new mechanism. New Phytologist. 186:564-566.

Karban, R., and Shiojiri, K. 2010. Identity recognition and plant behavior. Plant Signaling and Behavior. 5:854-855.

Karban, R., Shiojiri, K. and Ishizaki, S. 2010. An air-transfer experiment confirms the role of volatile cues in communication between plants. American Naturalist. 176:381-384.

Molecular Ecology Resources Primer Development Consortium, Abdoullaye, D., Acevedo, I., Aebayo, A. A., Behrmann-Godel, J., Benjamin, R. C., Bock, D. G., Born, C., Brouat, C., Caccone, A., Cao, L.-Z., Casado-Amezúa, P., Catanéo, J., Correa-Ramirez, M. M., Cristescu, M. E., Dobigny, G., Egbosimba, E. E., Etchberger, L. K., Fan, B., Fields, P. D., Forcioli, D., Furla, P., Garcia de Leon, F. J., García-Jiménez, R., Gautheir, P., Gergs, R., González, C., Granjon, L., Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, C., Havill, N. P., Helsen, P., Hether, T. D., Hoffman, E. A., Hu, X., Ingvarsson, P. K., Ishizaki, S., Ji, H., Ji, X. S., Jimenez, M. L., Kapil, R., Karban, R., Keller, S. R., Kubota, S., Li, S., Li, W., Lim, D. D., Lin, H., Liu, X., Luo, Y., Machordom, A., Martin, A. P., Matthysen, E., Mazzela, M. N., McGeoch, M. A., Meng, Z., NishizawaI, M., OBrien, P., Ohara, M., Ornelas, J. F., Ortu, M. F., Pedersen, A. B., Preston, L., Ren, Q., Rothhaupt, K.-O., Sackett, L. C., Sang, Q., Sawyer, G. M., Shiojiri, K., Taylor, D. R., Van Dongen, S., Van Vuuren, B. J., Vandewoestijne, S., Wang, H., Wang, J. T., Wang, L., XU, X.-L., Yang, G., Yang, Y., Zeng, Y. Q., Zhang, Q.-W., Zhang, Y., Zhao, Y. and Zhou, Y. 2010. Permanent Genetic Resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 08/01-09/30/2009. Molecular Ecology Resources. 10:232-236. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-0998.2009.02796.x.

Connecticut

Peer Reviewed:
Lehrer, J. M. and Brand, M.H. 2010. Purple-leaved Japanese barberry (var. atropurpurea) genotypes become visually indistinguishable from green-leaved genotypes (Berberis thunbergii DC.) at low light levels. J. Environmental Horticulture. 28(3):187-189.

Delaware

Peer Reviewed:
Frey, T.J., Weldekidan, T., Colbert, T., Wolters, P.J.C.C., and Hawk, J.A. 2011. Fitness Evaluation of Rcg1, a Locus which Confers Resistance to Colletotrichum graminicola (Ces.) G.W.Wils., using Near-Isogenic Maize (Zea mays L.) Hybrids. Crop Sci. 51: advance online copy at doi: 10.2135/cropsci2010.10.0613.

Jumbo, M.B., Weldekidan, T., Holland, J.B., and Hawk, J.A. 2011. Comparison of Conventional, Modified Single Seed Descent and Doubled Haploid Breeding Methods for Maize Inbred Lines Development using GEM Breeding Crosses. Crop Sci. 51:1534-1543.

Indiana

Peer Reviewed:
Janick, J. (editor). 2010. Plant Breeding Reviews. 33:386.

Janick, J. (editor). 2010. Horticultural Reviews. 36:371.

Janick, J. (editor). 2010. Horticultural Reviews. 37:2010.

Janick, J. 2009. Pear history and future (in Japanese). Proc. 10th Annual Pear Forum. p.3-20

Janick, J. 2010. Plant iconography and art: Source of information on horticultural technology. Bulletin USAVM Horticulture. 67(1):11-23.

Janick, J., Kamenetsky, R., and Puttaswamy, S. 2010. Horticulture of the Taj Mahal: Gardens of the imagination. Chronica Horticulturae. 50(3):31-33.

Not Peer-reviewed:
Janick, J., Daunay, M-C., and Paris, H.S. 2009. Horticulture and health: Ancient and Medieval views. International Conference on Horticulture. Nov. 9-12. Bangalore India.Souvenir. p.23-34.

Janick, J., Daunay, M-C., and Paris, H.S. 2010. Horticulture and health: Ancient and medieval views. In: Pren Nath and P.B. Gaddagimath (Eds), Horticulture and Livelihood Security, Scientific Publishers Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. p. 39-52.

Iowa

Peer Reviewed:
Coyle, D.R., Hart, E.R., McMillin, J.D., Rule, L.C. and Hall, R.B. 2008. Effects of repeated cottonwood leaf beetle defoliation on Populus growth and economic value over an 8-year harvest rotation. Forest Ecology and Management. 225(8-9):3365-3373.

Zalesny, J.A., Zalesny Jr., R.S., Coyle, D.R., Hall, R.B., and Bauer, E.O. 2009. Clonal variation in morphology of Populus root systems following irrigation with landfill leachate or water during 2 years of establishment. Bioenerg. Res. 2:134-143.

Zalesny, J.A., Zalesny Jr., R.S., Wiese, A.H., and Hall, R.B. 2007. Choosing tree genotypes for phytoremediation of landfill leachate using phyto-recurrent selection. Int. Journal of Phytoremediation. 9(6):513-530.

Zalesny Jr., R.S., Hall, R.B., Zalesny, J.A., McMahon, B.G., Berguson, W.E. and Stanosz, G.R. 2009. Biomass and genotype x environment interactions of Populus energy crops in the Midwestern United States. Bioenerg. Res. 2:106-122.

Zalesny, J.A., Zalesny Jr., R.S., Coyle, D.R., and Hall, R.B. 2007. Growth and biomass of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate. Forest Ecology and Management. 248(3):143-152.


Kansas

Peer Reviewed:
Djanaguiraman, M., and Prasad, P.V.V. 2010. Ethylene production under high temperature stress causes premature leaf senescence in soybean. Functional Plant Biology. 37:1071-1084.

Djanaguiraman, M., Prasad, P.V.V., and Seppanen, M. 2010. Selenium protects sorghum leaves from oxidative damage under high temperature stress by enhancing antioxidant defense system. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry. 48:999-1007.

Fu, J., Mom
ilovi, I., Clemente, T.E., Nersesian, N., Trick, H.N., and Ristic, Z. 2008. Heterologous expression of a plastid EF-Tu reduces protein thermal aggregation and enhances CO2 fixation in wheat (Triticum aestivum) following heat stress. Plant Molecular Biology. 68:277-288

Gholipoor, M., Prasad, P.V.V., Mutava, R.N., and Sinclair, T.R. 2010. Genetic variability of transpiration response to vapor pressure deficit among sorghum genotypes. Field Crops Research. 119:85-90.

Kolluru, V., Fritz, A.K.,Paulsen, G.M., Bai, G., Pandravada, S. and Gill, B.S. 2010. Modeling and mapping QTL for senescence-related traits in winter wheat under high temperature. Molecular Breeding. doi:10.1007/s11032-009-9366-8.

Stamm, M. 2010. Kiowa Canola. Kans. Ag. Exp. St. and Coop. Ext. Ser., Manhattan, KS. L-928.

Holman, J., Maxwell, S., Stamm, M., and Martin, K. 2011. Effects of planting date and tillage on winter canola. Crop Management. doi: 10.1094/CM-2011-0324-01-RS.

Stamm, M., Buck, J., Godsey, C., Heer, W., Holman, Johnson, J., Krall, J., ONeill, M., Rife, C., Santra, D., Sij,, D., Spradlin, E., and Starner, D. 2011. Riley Canola. Kans. Ag. Exp. St. and Coop. Ext. Ser., Manhattan, KS. L-929.

Stamm, M., Dooley, S., Angadi, S., Auld, D., Bacon, R., Berrada, A., Bhardwaj, H., Cabot, P., Casteel, S., Cebert, E., Cramer, G., Darby, H., Davis, V., Day, D., Delaney, D., Dunford, Enjalbert, J-N., R. Freed, J. Gassett, M. Gilmer, C. Godsey, K. Grady, J. Hagan, J. Hain, W. Heer, J. Holman, S. Hulbert, B. Johnson, J. Johnson, B. Kirksey, R. Kochenower, J. Krall, D. Ladd, J. Lamle, K. Larson, E. Lentz, C. Mansfield, H. Mason, J. Nachtman, P. Nelson, M. ONeill, C. Owen, C. Pearson, S. Quiring, J. Rickertsen, C. Rife, A. Sebilius, M. Schmidt, C. Schmidt, R. Schrock, J. Sij, D. Spradlin, D. Starner, C. Trostle, K. Tungate, J. Valliant, and G. Ware. 2011. 2010 National Winter Canola Variety Trial. Rep. Prog. 1044, Kans. Ag. Exp. St. and Coop. Ext. Serv., Manhattan, KS.


Michigan

Peer Reviewed:
Ando, K., and Grumet, R. 2010. Transcriptional profiling of rapidly growing cucumber fruit by 454-pyrosequencing analysis. J Amer Soc Hortic Sci. 135:291-302.

Ando, K., and Grumet, R. 2010. Transcriptomic analysis of cucumber fruit development. Cucurbitaceae 2010 Proceedings. Thies JA, Kousik S, Levi A (Editors). JASHS press. p. 155-158.

Bradford, E., Hancock, J.F., and Warner, R.W. 2010. Interactions of temperature and photoperiod determine expression of repeat flowering in strawberry. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 135:1-6.

Evans, K., Iezzoni, A., Peace, C., Luby, J., Brown, S., van de Weg, E., Main, D., Bassil, N., Fazio, G., Yue, C., Weebadde, C., and McFerson, J. 2010. RosBREED Enabling marker-assisted breeding in the WSU apple breeding program. Journal of Fruit Science. 27 Suppl:43-47.

Haldar, S., Haendiges, S., Edge-Garza, D.A.,Oraguzie, N., Olmstead, J.W., Iezzoni, A., and Peace, C. 2010. Applying genetic markers for self-compatibility in the WSU Sweet Cherry Breeding Program. Acta Horticulturae. 859:375-380.

Hamilton, J.P., Hansey, C.N., Whitty, B.R., Stoffel, K., Massa, A.N., Van Deynze, A., De Jong, W.S., Douches, D.S., and Buell, C.R. 2011. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in elite North American potato germplasm. BMC Genomics. 12:302. doi: 10.1186/1471-2164-12-302.

Hancock, J.F. Finn, C.E., Luby, J.J., Dale, A., Callow, P.W., and Serce, S. 2010. Reconstruction of the strawberry, Fragaria ´ananassa, using native genotypes of F. virginiana and F. chiloensis. HortScience. 45:1006-1013.

Hummer, K.E. and Hancock, J.F. 2010. Strawberry genomics: Botanical history, cultivation, traditional breeding and new technologies. In: Genetics and Genomics of Rosaceae. Springer, New York.

Iezzoni, A., Luby, J., Yue, C., McFerson, J., van de Weg, E., Fazio, G., Main, D., Bassil, N., Peace, C., and Weebadde, C. 2010. RosBREED Project Brochure.

Iezzoni, A., Luby, J., Yue, C., van de Weg, E., Fazio, G., Main, D., Bassil, N., Weebadde, C., McFerson, J., and Peace, C. 2010. RosBREED: Enabling marker-assisted breeding in Rosaceae. Acta Horticulturae. 859:389-394.

Illa, E., Sargent, D.J., Girona, E.L., Bushakra, J., Cestaro, A., Crowhurst, R., Pindo, M., Cabrera, A., van der Knapp, E., Iezzoni, A., Gardiner, S., Velasco, R., Arus, P., Chagne, D., and Troggio, M., 2011. Comparative analysis of rosaceous genomes and the reconstruction of a putative ancestral genome for the family. BMC Evolutionary Biology. 11:9.

Olmstead, J.W., Whiting, M.D., Lang, G., Ophardt, D., and Oraguzie, N. 2010. PC7146-8 (Benton) Sweet Cherry. HortScience. 46(1):121-122.

Olmstead, J.W., Whiting, M.D., Lang, G., Ophardt, D., and Oraguzie, N. 2010. PC7064(Selah) Sweet Cherry. HortScience. 46(1):123-124.

Oraguzie, N., Ophardt, D., Long, L., Lang, G., and Whiting, M.D. 2010. KionaTM Sweet Cherry. HortScience. 45(12):1906-1907.

Peace, C., Fazio, F., Evans, K., Weebadde, C., and Iezzoni, A. 2010. Marker-Assisted Breeding (MAB) Pipeline Team goals and activities: Channeling socio-economic and DNA information into routine breeding operations. RosBREED Project Brochure.

Siddiq, M., Iezzoni, A., Khan, A., Breen, P., Sebolt, A., Dolan, K., and Ravi, R. 2010. Characterization of new tart cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) selections based on fruit quality, total anthocyanins, and antioxidant capacity. Intl. J. Food Properties.
doi: 10.1080/10942910903277697.

Song, G.Q., Loescher, W.H., Sink, K.C., Ma, Y., Herlache, T., and Hancock, J.F. 2010. A novel mannose-based selection system for plant transformation using celery mannose-6-phosphate reductase gene (M6PR). Plant Cell Reports. 29:163-172.

Stegmeir, T.L., Finn, C.E., Warner, R., and Hancock, J.F. 2010. Performance of an elite strawberry population derived from wild germplasm of Fragaria chiloensis and F. virginiana. HortScience. 45:1140-1145.

Tao, R., and Iezzoni, A.F. 2010. The S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility system in Prunus exhibits distinct genetic and molecular features. Scientia Horticulturae. 124:423-433.

Tsukamoto, T., Hauck, N.R., Tao, R., Jiang, J., and Iezzoni, A.F. 2010. Molecular and genetic analysis of four nonfunctional S haplotype variants derived from a common ancestral S haplotype identified in sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.). Genetics. 184:411-427.

Weebadde, C., Sebolt, A., Iezzoni, A., and Peace, C. 2010. RosBREED: Enabling marker-assisted breeding. In: Rosaceae Newsletter. 1(4).

Weebadde, C., Sebolt, A., Iezzoni, A., Peace, C., and Bassil, N. 2011. RosBREED: Enabling marker-assisted breeding. In: Rosaceae Newsletter. 2(1).

Weebadde, C., Sebolt, A., Iezzoni, A., Peace, C., Yue, C., McCracken, V., and Gallardo, K. 2011. RosBREED: Enabling marker-assisted breeding in Rosaceae Newsletter. 2(2).

Non-Peer Reviewed:
Ando, K., and Grumet, R. 2010. Analysis of gene expression during early cucumber fruit development. (Abstract). ASPB P04058.

Bassil, N., Gilmore, B., Main, D., Peace, C., Mockler, T., Wilhelm, L., van de Weg, E., Davis, T., Chagne, D., Gardiner, S., Crowhurst, R., Verde, I., Sosinski, B., Morgante, M., Arus, P., Velasco, R., Troggio, M., Cestaro, A., Fazio, G., Norelli, J., Rees, J. and Iezzoni, A. 2011. New age of DNA marker discovery in Rosaceae. Program & Abstract Guide. abst. W252. Plant & Animal Genome XIX, San Diego, CA.

Bassil, N., Gilmore, B., Main, D., Peace, C., Mockler, T., Wilhelm, L., van de Weg, E., Davis, T., Chagne, D., Gardiner, S., Crowhurst, R., Verde, I., Sosinski, B., Morgante, M., Arus, P., Velasco, R., Troggio, M., Cestaro, A., Fazio, G., Norelli, J., Rees, J., and Iezzoni, A. 2010. RosBREEDs SNP detection pipeline and community-available genomic resources. 5th Intl. Rosaceae Genomics Conf, Stellenbosch, South Africa.

Bigelow, P., Loescher, W., and Grumet, R. 2010. The competitive fitness of abiotic stress tolerance enhancing transgenes under field conditions. (Abstract). ASPB P07106.

Bigelow, P., Loescher, W., and Grumet, R. 2010. The effect of environment on transgene evaluation. (Abstract). HortScience. 45:S257.

Evans, K., Jung, S., Lee, T., Oraguzie, N., Peace, C., and Main, D. 2010. Developing an online toolbox for tree fruit breeding. 5th Intl. Rosaceae Genomics Conf, Stellenbosch, South Africa.

Ferenczi, A., and Grumet, R. 2010. Biosafety parameters when assessing environmental risks of complex traits. (Abstract). 11th International Symposium on the Biosafety of Genetically Modified Organisms (ISBGMO).

Grumet, R. 2010. Transcriptome analysis of cucumber fruit development using next-generation sequencing technologies. (Abstract). HortScience. 45:S7.

Grumet, R., and Ando, K. 2010. Transcriptomic analysis of early fruit development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus). (Abstract).
PAG XVIII http://www.intl-pag.org/18/abstracts/W25 PAGXVIII 184.html.

Hao, J.J., Hausbeck, M.K., Ngouajio, M., Grumet, R., and Davis, R.M. 2010. Detection and management of Phytophthora and Pythium in carrot, tomato, cucurbits, and asparagus. (Abstract). HortScience. 45:S206.

Iezzoni, A. 2011. DNA sequences of apple and peach released in 2010: What does this mean for the fruit grower Michigan Orchard and Vineyard Show, Traverse City, MI.

Iezzoni, A., Peace, C., Bassil, N., Bink, M., Brown, S., Byrne, D., Clark, J., Crisosto, C., Davis, T., Evans, K., Fazio, G., Finn, C., Gallardo, K., Gasic, K., Gradziel, T., Hancock, J., Jussaume, R., Luby, J., Main, D., McCracken, V., Oraguzie, N., Reighard, G., Stone, A., Taylor, M., van de
Mahoney, L., Zhang, Q., Zhang, H., Orcheski, B., van de Weg, E., Bassil, N., Iezzoni, A., and Davis, T. 2011. Is the F3'H gene associated with fruit Pigment Phenotype in Strawberry. (Abstract). Plant & Animal Genome XIX, San Diego, CA, January 14-19. P458.

Peace, C., Evans, K., Oraguzie, N., Main, D., Edge-Garza, D., Guan, Y., Bellamkonda, M., Verma, S., van de Weg, E., McFerson, J., Iezzoni, A., and Bliss. F. 2010. DNA-Informed breeding for high-impact fruit quality and productivity traits in Washington, USA. 5th Intl. Rosaceae Genomics Conf, Stellenbosch, South Africa.

Perry, R., Guyer, D., Iezzoni, A., Lang, G., Flore, J., Rothwell, N., Schwallier, P., and Thornsbury, S. 2010. Preliminary research with continuous mechanized harvesting systems for tart cherry. (Abstract). International Horticulture Congress meeting, Lisbon, Portugal, August 2020.

Taft, J., Little, H., Hammar, S., and Grumet, R. 2010. Effect of floral-primordia targeted ethylene production on sex determination in melon (Cucumis melo L.). Cucurbitaceae 2010 Proceedings. Thies JA, Kousik S, Levi A (Editors). JASHS press. p. 159-162.

Taft, J., Little, H., Hammar, S.A., and Grumet, R. 2010. Effects of stamen- and carpel-primordia targeted expression of the ethylene biosynthetic enzyme, ACS, on sex expression in melon. (Abstract). ASPB P04037.
Taft, J.A., Little, H.A., Hammar, S.A., and Grumet, R. 2010. Effect of carpel-primordia-targeted inhibition of ethylene perception on sex expression and fruit ripening in melon (Cucumis melo L.) HortScience. (Abstract). 45:S303.

Weg, E., Wang, D., Weebadde, C., Xu, K., and Yue, C. 2010. RosBREEDs approach to bridging the gap between genomics knowledge and breeding application. 5th Intl. Rosaceae Genomics Conf, Stellenbosch, South Africa.

Yue, C., Gallardo, K., McCracken, V., Luby, J., Liu, L., Yang, N., Taylor, M., and Jussaume, R. 2010. Socio-Economics Teams Goals and Activities: Informing breeding decisions with YOUR preferences. RosBREED Project Brochure.

Zheng, Q., McCracken, V., and Taylor, M. 2010. Apple variety choices based on national household-level data. Annual Meetings Ag Applied Economics Assoc, Denver, CO.


Minnesota

Peer Reviewed:
Lin, R., Glazebrook, J., Katugari, F., Orf, J.H., and Gibson, S.L. 2010. Identification of genes differentially expressed between developing seeds of different soybean varieties. BMC Plant Biology. 10:278.

Non-Peer Reviewed:
Bolen, Y-T., Haun, W., Muehlbauer, G., Orf, J., Naeve, S., Stupar, R., and Vance, C. 2010. Fast neutron mutagenesis of soybean: A resource for the community. 13th Biennial Molecular and Cellular Biology of the Soybean Conference 2010.

Chen, S., Potter, B., and Orf, J.H. 2010. Virulence of the soybean cyst nematode has increased over years in Minnesota. Proc. Soc. of Nematologists.

Naeve, S.L., Orf, J.H., and Miller-Garvin, J. 2010. Analysis of the U.S. Non-GMO Food Soybean Variety Pipeline. Proc. Second Soyfood Alliance Conference, Tokyo, Japan. 07/01/2010.

Naeve, S.L., Orf, J.H., Miller-Garvin, J., and O'Neill, T. 2010. Quality of the United States Food Soybean Crop 2010. USSEC Conferences Korea and Japan.

Naeve, S.L., Orf, J.H., and Miller-Garvin, J. 2010. Quality of the United States soybean crop 2010. USSEC Conferences China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.

Orf, J.H. 2010. Soybean Breeding in the Northern U.S. Proc. 6th Annual National Center for Soybean Biotechnology Symposium.

Orf, J.H., Naeve, S.L., Schaus, P.J., and Killam, A. 2010. Minnesota Certified Seed Guide 2010. p. 50-69.

Orf, J.H., Naeve, S.L., Schaus, P.J., and Killam, A. 2010. MP116-2010. p. 48-68.

Purcell, L.C., Carter, T.E., Sinclair, T.R., King, A., Chen, P., Boerma, H.R., Ray, J.D., Charlson, D.V., Orf, J.H., Specht, J.E., Rufty, T.W., and Fritschi, F. 2009. Tweeking the genetics and physiology of soybean to increase dryland yields. Proc. 39th Soybean Seed Research Conference CD-RM. American Seed Trade Assn.


Missouri

Peer Reviewed:
Cannon, S., Tomkins, J., Schmutz, J., Stacey, G., and Jackson, S. 2008. Microsatellite discovery from BAC end sequences and genetic mapping to anchor the soybean physical and genetic maps. Genome. 51:294-302.

Flores, T., Karpova, O., Su, X., Zeng, P., Bilyeu, K., Sleper, D.A., Nguyen, H.T., and Zhang, Z.J. 2008. Silencing of GmFAD3 gene by siRNA leads to low alpha-linolenic acids (18:3) of fad3-mutant phenotype in soybean [Glycine max (Merr.)]. Transgenic Res. 10.1007/s11248-008-9167-6.

Lee, J-D., Yu, J-K., Hwang, Y-H., Blake, S., So, Y-S. , Lee, G-J., Nguyen, H.T. and Shannon, J. G. 2008. Genetic diversity of wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc) accessions from South Korea and other countries. Crop Science. 48:606-616.

Nunberg, A., Bedell, J.A., Budiman, M.A., Citek, R.W., Clifton, S.W., Fulton, L., Pape, C., Cai, Z., Joshi, T., Nguyen, H.T., Xu, D., and Stacey, G. 2006. Survey sequencing of soybean elucidates the genome structure and composition. Functional Plant Biology. 33:1-9.

Shannon, J.G., Nelson, R.L., and Wrather, J.A. 2010. Registration of LG04-6863 soybean germplasm line with diverse pedigree. J. of Plant Registrations. 4:70-72.

Shannon, J.G., Wrather, J.A., Sleper, D.A., Nguyen, H.T., and Anand, S.C. 2007. Registration of Stoddard soybean. J. of Crop Registrations. 1:28-29.

Shoemaker, R.C., Grant, D., Olson, T., Warren, W.C., Wing, R., Yu, Y., Kim, H., Cregan, P., Joseph, B., Futrell-Griggs, M., Nelson, W., Davito, J., Walker, J., Wallis, J., Kremitski, C., Scheer, D., Clifton, S.W., Graves, T., Nguyen, H., Wu, X., Luo, M., Dvorak, J., Nelson, R.,
Cannon, S., Tomkins, J., Schmutz, J., Stacey, G., and Jackson, S. 2008. Microsatellite discovery from BAC end sequences and genetic mapping to anchor the soybean physical and genetic maps. Genome. 51:294-302.

Vuong, T., Sleper, D., Shannon, J., and Nguyen, H. 2010. Novel quantitative trait loci for broad-based resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) in soybean PI 567516C. TAG. doi: 10.1007/s00122-010-1385-7.

Wu, X., Zhong, G., Findley, S., Cregan, P., Stacey, G., and Nguyen, H.T. 2008. Genetic marker anchoring by six-dimensional pools for development of a soybean physical map. BMC Genomics. 9:28. doi: 10.1186/1471-2164-9-28.

Zhang, X.C., Wu, X., Findley, S., Wan, J., Libault, M., Nguyen, H.T., Cannon, S.B., and Stacey, G. 2007. Molecular evolution of lysin motif-type receptor-like kinases in plants. Plant Physiol. 144:623-36.

Non-Peer Reviewed:
Guttikonda, S., Valliyodan, B., and Nguyen, H.T. 2007. Genetic engineering of AtDREB1D transcription factor to improve drought tolerance in soybean. Frontiers in Transgenesis, Danforth Center International Fall Symposium, St. Louis, MO.

Neelakandan, A.K., Valliyodan, B., Nes, D.W., and Nguyen, H.T. 2007. Bioengineering phytosterol accumulation in soybean. Missouri Life Sciences symposium, University of Missouri-Columbia, Missouri.

Pathan, M.S., Lee, J-D, Shannon, J.G., and Nguyen, H.T. 2007. Recent advances in breeding for drought and salt stress tolerance in soybean. In: Advances in molecular-breeding toward drought and salt tolerant crops. M. A. Jenks, P. M. Hasegawa, and S.M. Jain (eds), Springer USA. p. 739-773.

Shannon, J.G., Wrather, J.A., Sleper, D.A., Robbins, R.T., Nguyen, H.T., and Anand, S. 2007. Registration of Jake soybean. J. of Crop Registrations. 1:29-30.

Vuong, T.V., Wu, X., Pathan, M.S., Valliyodan, B., and Nguyen, H.T. 2007. Genomics approaches to soybean improvement. In: Genomics-assisted crop improvement. P. K. Varshney and R. Tuberosa (eds), Springer USA.

Valliyodan, B., Libault, M., Xu, D., Stacey, G., and Nguyen, H.T. 2007. Identification of abiotic stress specific molecular switches for stress tolerance and enhanced seed composition in soybean through high throughput quantitative real time PCR. Plant Biology. 2007 American Society for Plant Biology, Chicago, IL.

Valliyodan, B. and Nguyen, H.T. 2008. Genomics of abiotic stress in soybean. In: Genetics and Genomics of Soybean. Gary Stacey (ed.), Springer New York, U.S.A. 2:343-272.

Wrather, A., Shannon, G., Balardin, R., Carregal, L., Escobar, R., Gupta, G.K., Ma, Z., Morel, W., Ploper D., and Tenuta, A. 2010. Effect of diseases on soybean yield in the top eight producing countries in 2006. Plant Health Progress. doi: 10.1094/PHP-2009-01XX-01-RS.


Nebraska

Peer Reviewed:
Dwivedi, S. H., Upadhyaya, H., Senthilvel, S., Hash, C., Fukunaga, K., Diao, X., Santra, D.K., Baltensperger, D., and Prasad, M. 2011. Millets: Genetic and Genomic Resources. Plant Breeding Review. (accepted).

Pavlista, A.D., Santra, D.K., Isbell, T.A., Baltensperger, D.D., Hergert, G.W., Krall, J., Mesbach, A., Johnson, J., O'Neill, M., Aiken, R., and Berrada, A. 2011. Adaptability of Irrigated Spring Canola to the US High Plains. Industrial Crops and Products. 33(1):165-169.

Santra D. K., Plyler-Harveson, R., Harvey, S., Reddy, S., and Frickel, G. 2010. Characterization of proso millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) germplasm. Isbell, T.A. and Dierig, D.A. Eds. (2010). In: 22nd Annual AAIC Meeting 2010 New Crops: Exploring Diversity and Preserving Our Future: Program and Abstracts. Hilton Hotel, Fort Collins, CO. p. 48.

Santra D. K., Plyler-Harveson, R., Harvey, S., Reddy, S., and Frickel, G. 2010. Genetic characterization of proso millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) germplasm. Proceedings of ASA-CSSA-SSSA 2010 International Annual Meeting. Long Beach, CA. 10/31-11/04/2010. p. 118.

Thomas, J.A., Urrea, C.A., Harveson, R.M., and Nielsen, K. 2010. Identification of sources of bacterial wilt resistance in dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Annu. Rept. Bean Improv. Coop. 53:130-131.

Urrea, C.A., D. D. Baltensperger, R.M. Harveson, G.E. Frickel, and A.E. Koehler. 2010. Registration of the chickpea germplasm PHREC-Ca- Comp. #1 with enhanced resistance to Ascochyta blight. J. of Plant Reg. 5(1):1-6.

Urrea, C.A., Harveson, R.M., Koehler, A.E., Burgener, P., and Baltensperger, D.D. 2010. Evaluating the agronomic potential of chickpea germplasm for western Nebraska. Agronomy J. 102(4):1179-1185.

Urrea, C.A., and Porch, T. 2010. Phenotypic evaluation of a subset of the Phaseolus vulgaris core collections, the P. acutifolius germplasm collection, and cultivars for drought tolerance in Nebraska and Puerto Rico. Annu. Rept. Bean Improv. Coop. 53:164-165.

Non-Peer Reviewed:
Harveson, R.M., Markell, S.G., Goswami, R., Urrea, C.A, Burrows, M.E., Dugan, F., Chen, W. and Skoglund, L.G. 2010. Ascochyta blight of chickpeas. Plant Health Progress. (accepted).

Harveson, R.M., and Urrea, C.A. 2010. Developing new varieties with resistance to bacterial brown spot for Nebraska dry bean production. The Bean Bag. 28(2):15.

Harveson, R.M., and Urrea, C.A. 2010. Developing dry bean resistance to bacterial brown spot. StarHerald, May 30. p. 4.

Harveson, R.M., and Urrea, C.A. 2010. Evaluating germplasm and breeding disease resistance for chickpeas and dry beans in western Nebraska. StarHerald, April 4. p. 2.

Urrea, C.A., Harveson, R.M., and Thomas, J. 2010. Selecting and improving chickpea adaptation to western Nebraska. StarHerald, April 4. p. 3.


New Jersey

Peer Reviewed:
Molnar, T.J., Capik, J., Zhao, S., and Zhang, N. 2010. First report of Eastern Filbert Blight on Corylus avellana Gasaway and VR20-11 caused by Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Muller in New Jersey. Plant Disease. 94:1265.

Molnar, T.J., Goffreda, J.C., and Funk, C.R. 2010. Survey of Corylus Resistance to Anisogramma anomala from Different Geographic Locations. HortScience. 45:832-836.

Non-Peer Reviewed:
Inzano, M. and Molnar, T.J. 2010. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug: A New Pest of Hazelnuts. The nutshell, quarterly newsletter of the Northern Nut Growers Association. 64(4):12-16.

Molnar, T.J. 2010. A new call for hazelnuts. The nutshell, quarterly newsletter of the Northern Nut Growers Association. 64(1):31-32.

Molnar, T.J. 2010. A (second) new call for hazelnuts. The nutshell, quarterly newsletter of the Northern Nut Growers Association. 64(2):12.

Molnar, T.J. 2010. Eastern filbert blight: does genetic resistance hold up across different regions The nutshell, quarterly newsletter of the Northern Nut Growers Association. 64(2):16-24.

Molnar, T.J. and Capik, J. 2010. Advances in Hazelnut Research in North America. Abstracts of the 28th International Horticultural Congress. Lisbon, Portugal. 2(S06.008):294

Molnar, T.J., Capik, J., Zaurov, D., Morgan, A., and Funk, C.R. 2010. Hybrid Hazelnut Consortium: a collaborative national effort to expand hazelnut production. Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Rutgers Turfgrass Symposium. Center for Turfgrass Science. School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. Rutgers University. p. 47.

Plant variety protection certificates:
Brilman, L., Bara, R.F., Meyer, W.A., and Reed Funk, C. 2010. United States Plant Variety Protection Certificate no. 200200227. SR-4420 perennial ryegrass. Issued August 31, 2010.

Brilman, L., Hignight, K., Bonos, S.A., and Reed Funk, C. 2010. United States Plant Variety Protection Certificate no. 200400289. Peregrine ryegrass. Issued Feb 10, 2010.

Floyd, D., Bara, R.F., Wilson, M.M., Funk, C.R., and Meyer, W.A. 2010. United States Plant Variety Protection Certificate no. 200400007. Blazer 4 perennial ryegrass. Issued July 7, 2010.

Fraser, M.L., Rose-Fricker, C.A., Meyer, W.A., and Reed Funk, C. 2010. United States Plant Variety Protection Certificate no. 200200243. Citation Fore perennial ryegrass. Issued August 31, 2010.

Meyer, W.A., Molnar, T., Funk, C.R., and Bara, R.F. 2010. United States Plant Variety Protection Certificate no. 200600115. Bonaire Kentucky bluegrass. Issued February 10, 2010.

Nelson, E., Meyer, W.A., Bara, R.F., and Reed Funk, C. 2010. United States Plant Variety Protection Certificate no. 20020220. Inspire perennial ryegrass. Issued November 17, 2010.

North Dakota

Non-Peer Reviewed:
Berti, M., Wilckens, R., Fischer, S., Solis, A., Gonzalez, W., and Johnson, B.L. 2009. Seeding date influence on camelina seed yield, yield components, and oil content in Chile. In: Annual meeting abstracts Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops, 11/14-19/2009. Gran Hotel Termas de Chillan, Chile. Available at http://www.aaic.org/ (verified 18 Dec. 2009).

Escobar, M., Berti, M., Matus, I., Tapia, M., Ceron, W.A., and Johnson, B.L. 2009. Genotype x environment interaction of canola (Brassica napus L.) in south central Chile. In: Annual meeting abstracts Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops.11/14-19/2009. Gran Hotel Termas de Chillan, Chile. Available at http://www.aaic.org/ (verified 18 Dec. 2009). Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops.

Johnson, B.L. 2009. Field pennycress evaluations in North Dakota. In: Annual meeting abstracts 11/01-05/2009. Pittsburgh, PA. ASA, CSSA, and SSSA, Madison, WI.

Johnson, B.L., Berti, M.T., Onemli, F., and Petersen, P.J. 2009. Double cropping sunflower after field pennycress in North Dakota. In: Annual meeting abstracts 11/14-19/2009. Gran Hotel Termas de Chillan, Chile. Available at http://www.aaic.org/ (verified 18 Dec. 2009). Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops, Ames, IA.

Johnson, B.L., Berti, M.T., Onemli, F., and Petersen, P.J. 2009. Seeding date influence on field pennycress in North Dakota. In: Annual meeting abstracts Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops 11/14-19/2009. Gran Hotel Termas de Chillan, Chile. Available at http://www.aaic.org/ (verified 18 Dec. 2009).

Lizama, D., Berti, M., Solis, A., Wilckens, R., Vidal, I., Gonzales, W., and Johnson, B.L. 2009. Oriental mustard (Brassica juncea L.) seed yield, and plant nitrogen absorption response to nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus fertilizer in Chile. In: Annual meeting abstracts Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops11/14-19/2009. Gran Hotel Termas de Chillan, Chile. Available at http://www.aaic.org/ (verified 18 Dec. 2009).

Solis, A., Berti, M., Wilckens, R., Gonzales, W., and Johnson, B.L. 2009. Camelina (Camelina sativa L.) seed yield, response to nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus fertilizer in south central Chile. In: Annual meeting abstracts Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops
11/14-19/2009. Gran Hotel Termas de Chillan, Chile. Available at http://www.aaic.org/ (verified 18 Dec. 2009).

Ramirez, K., Berti, M., Wilckens, R., Fischer, S., Solis, A., Gonzalez, W., and Johnson, B.L. 2009. Seeding date influence on mustard (Brassica juncea L.) seed yield, yield components, and oil content in Chile. In: Annual meeting abstracts Assn. for the Advancement of Industrial Crops11/14-19/2009. Gran Hotel Termas de Chillan, Chile. Available at http://www.aaic.org/ (verified 18 Dec. 2009).

Ohio

Peer Reviewed:
Gupta, R., Balasubramaniam, V.M., Schwartz, S.J., and Francis, D.M. 2010. Storage stability of lycopene in tomato juice subjected to combined pressure-heat treatments. J Agric Food Chem. 58(14):8305-8313.

Hutton S.F., Scott J.W., Yang W., Sim S.C., Francis D.M., and Jones J.B. 2010. Identification of QTL associated with resistance to bacterial spot race T4 in tomato. Theor Appl Genet. 121(7):1275-1287 [Epub ahead of print]. http://www.springerlink.com/content/04p1205n44176p40/.

Robbins, M.D., Masud, M.A.T., Panthee, D.P., Gardner, R.G., Francis, D.M., and Stevens, M.R. 2010. Marker-assisted Selection for Coupling Phase Resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus and Phytophthora infestans (Late Blight) in Tomato. Hortscience. 45(10):1424-1428.

Robbins, M.D., Sim, S-C., Yang, W., Van Deynze, A., van der Knaap, E., Joobeur, T., and Francis, D.M. 2010. Mapping and linkage disequilibrium analysis with a genome-wide collection of SNPs that detect polymorphism in cultivated tomato. Journal of Experimental Botany. http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2010/12/30/jxb.erq367.

Rodriguez, G.R., Moyseenko, J.B., Robbins, M.D., Huarachi Morejon, N., Francis, D.M., and van der Knaap, E. 2010. Tomato Analyzer: A Useful Software Application to Collect Accurate and Detailed Morphological and Colorimetric Data from Two-dimensional Objects. J. Vis. Exp. (JoVE). 37. http://www.jove.com/index/details.stpid=1856, doi: 10.3791/1856.

Rubio-Diaz, D.E., Santos, A., Francis, D.M., and Rodriguez-Saona, L.E. 2010. Carotenoid stability during production and storage of tomato juice made from tomatoes with diverse pigment profiles measured by infrared spectroscopy. J Agric Food Chem. 58(15):8692-8698.

Rubio-Diaz, D.E., De Nardo, T., Santos, A., de Jesus, S., Francis, D., and Rodriguez-Saona, L.E. 2009. Profiling of nutritionally important carotenoids from genetically-diverse tomatoes by infrared spectroscopy. Food Chem. 120:282-289.

Rubio-Diaz, D.E, Francis, D.M., and Rodriguez-Saona, L.E. 2010. External calibration models for the measurement of tomato carotenoids by infrared spectroscopy. Journal of Food Composition and Analysis 24(1):121-126. doi: 10.1016/j.jfca.2010.06.006.

Rubio-Diaz, D.E., Santos, A., Francis, D.M., and Rodriguez-Saona, L.E. 2010. Carotenoid Stability during Production and Storage of Tomato Juice Made from Tomatoes with Diverse Pigment Profiles Measured by Infrared Spectroscopy. J. Agric. Food Chem. 58, 8692-8698

Rivard, C.L., Sydorovych, O., OConnell, S., Peet, M.M., and Louws, F.L. 2010. An Economic Analysis of Two Grafted Tomato Transplant Production Systems in the United States. Hort. Technology. 20:794-803.

Sammons, J. D. and Struve, D. K. 2010. The effects of near-zero leachate irrigation on growth and water use efficiency and nutrient uptake of container grown baldcypress (Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.) plants. J. Environ. Hort. 28:27-34.

Struve, D., Ferrini, F., Chandra, B., and Fini, A. 2010. Propagation of Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, and Q/ pubescens seedlings by stem cuttings. HortScience. 45:172901733.

Sim, S-C., Robbins, M.D., Van Deynze, A., Michel, A.P., and Francis, D.M. 2010. Population structure and genetic differentiation associated with breeding history and selection in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Heredity 106:927-935. doi:10.1038/hdy.2010.139

Wang, Y., Chen, J., Francis, D.M., Shen, H., Wu, T., and Yang, W. 2010. Discovery of intron polymorphisms in cultivated tomato using both tomato and Arabidopsis genomic information. Theor Appl Genet. 121(7):1199-1207. http://www.springerlink.com/content/t67t760578v35130/.

Not Peer-Reviewed:
Francis, D., Schealeppi, J., Pisarski , V. and Huarachi, N. 2010. Grafting with Glue, 06/24/2010. Youtube: http://www.youtube.co/watchv=5Fd6tBQTTAg.


South Dakota

Peer Reviewed:
Caffe-Treml, M., Glover, K.D., Krishnan, P., and Hareland, G.A. 2010. Variability and Relationships Among Mixolab, Mixograph, and Baking Parameters Based on Multi-Environment Spring Wheat Trials. Cereal Chemistry. 67:574-580.

Glover K. D., Rudd, J. C., Devkota, R. N., Hall, R.G., Jin, Y., Osborne, L.E., Ingemansen, J.A., Rickertsen, J.R., Baltensperger, D. D. and Hareland, G. A. 2010. Registration of Brick Wheat. Journal of Plant Registrations. 4:22-27.

Gu, X.-Y., Zhang, L., Glover, K.D., Chu, C., Xu, S.S., Faris, J.D., Friesen, T.L., and Ibrahim, A. 2010. Genetic variation of seed dormancy in synthetic hexaploid wheat-derived populations. Crop Science. 50:1318-1324.

Malla, S., Ibrahim, A.M.H., Glover, K.D., and Berzonsky, W.A. 2010. Combining Ability of Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat. Commun. Biometry Crop Sci. 5:116-126.

Malla, S., Ibrahim, A.M.H., Little, R., Kalsbeck, S., Glover, K.D., Ren, C. 2010. Comparison of shifted multiplicative model, rank correlation, and biplot analysis for clustering winter wheat production environments. Euphytica. 174:157-170.

Malla, S., Ibrahim, A.M.H., Yen, Y., Berzonsky, W., Glover, K.D., and Stein, J. 2010. Analysis of a Putative Novel Source of Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight in Hard Winter Wheat. International Journal of Plant Breeding. 4:47-54.

Malla, S., Ibrahim, A.M.H., Yen, Y., Berzonsky, W., Glover, K.D., and Stein, J. 2010. Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis of Novel Fusarium Head Blight Resistance in Tokai 66. Am. J. of Ag. Bio. Sci. 5:62-69.

Mergoum, M., Glover, K.D., Anderson, J.A., Gigax, D., Berg, J., Singh, P.K., Ransom, J.K., and Isakson, P.J. 2010. Development and Agronomic Performance of Transgenic Roundup Ready Spring Wheat in the North Central Plains of the United States. Agronomy Journal. 102:1462-1467.


Texas

Peer Reviewed:
Glover, K.D., Rudd, J.C., Devkota, R.N., Hall, R.G., Jin, Y., Osborne, L.E., Ingemansen, J.A., Rickertsen, J.R., Baltensperger, D.D., and Hareland, G.A. 2010. Registration of "Brick" Wheat. Journal of Plant Registrations. 4(1):22-27.

Mengistu, N., Baenziger, P.S., Nelson, L.A., Eskridge, K.M., Klein, R.N., Baltensperger, D.D., and Elmore, R.W. 2010. Grain Yield Performance and Stability of Cultivar Blends vs. Component Cultivars of Hard Winter Wheat in Nebraska. Crop Science. 50(March-April).

Pavlista, A.D., Isbell, T.A., Baltensperger, D.D., and Hergert, C.W. 2010. Planting date and development of spring-seeded irrigated canola, brown mustard and camelina. Industrial Crops and Products. 33:451-456

Urrea, C.A., Harveson, R.M., Koehler, A.E., Burgener, P., and Baltensperger, D.D. 2010. Evaluating the Agronomic Potential of Chickpea Germplasm for Western Nebraska. Agronomy Journal. 102(4):1179-1185.

Wisconsin

Peer Reviewed:
Hansey, C.N and de Leon, N. 2011. Biomass yield and cell wall composition of corn (Zea mays L.) with alternative morphologies planted at variable densities. Crop Sci. 50:1005-1015.

Riedeman, E.S., and Tracy, W.F. 2009. Vegetative phase change characteristics and resistance to common rust (Puccinia sorghi) of corn cultivars developed in different eras. Crop Sci. 50:87-92 (in press).

Lee, E., and Tracy, W.F. 2009. Modern Maize Breeding. In: The Handbook of Maize, Genetics and Genomics. J. Bennetzen and S. Hake (eds.), Springer Science, New York, NY. 2:141-162.

Viesselmann, L.M. 2008. Recurrent selection for seedling growth in cool temperatures in sweet corn (Zea mays L.). Thesis. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.

Zyskowski, J.P. 2009. Genetics of traits relating to weed competitiveness in sweet corn (Zea mays L.). Thesis. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.

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Land Grant Participating States/Institutions

CA, CT, DE, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MI, MN, MO, MS, ND, NE, NJ, NY, OH, SD, TX, WI

Non Land Grant Participating States/Institutions

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